A court ruled that a particular 98-character tweet wasn’t sufficiently creative to warrant protection under German copyright law.

Inspired by a recording posted to Snapchat of a physical attack on a 14-year-old boy, a California bill would make it illegal to “willfully record a video of the commission of a violent felony pursuant to a conspiracy with the perpetrator.”

Instagram just made it easier to identify sponsored content —something required by the FTC’s endorsement guides.

Thirty-five states and the District of Columbia now have laws that make it illegal to distribute sexually explicit photos online without the subject’s permission—content known as “revenge porn” or “non-consensual pornography.” This article explores the efficacy of those laws and other legal-recourse options.

A proposed state law would prohibit employers in Texas from discriminating against employees and prospective employees based on the political beliefs they express on their personal social media accounts (and in any other non-work-related place).

A drone helped New York City fire fighters to extinguish a building fire for the very first time.

As part of its crusade against fake news, Facebook teamed up with non-partisan fact-checkers including Snopes to flag stories that are “disputed.”

The Wall Street Journal interviewed industry experts about the challenges and opportunities artificial intelligence will present for businesses.

A Facebook Messenger chatbot created by 20-year-old helps refugees seeking asylum by asking them a series of jargon-free questions to determine which application they need to submit.

The addition of a live-streaming feature helped a dating app in China to generate $194.8 million in revenue during Q4 alone.

While we’re on the subject of dating, is flirting on LinkedIn a faux pas?