One year since agreeing with the European Commission to remove hate speech within 24 hours of receiving a complaint about it, Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter and YouTube are removing flagged content an average of 59% of the time, the EC reports.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit held that a catering company violated the National Labor Relations Act when it fired an employee for posting to Facebook a profane rant about his supervisor in response to that supervisor admonishing him for “chitchatting” days before the employee and his coworkers were holding a vote to unionize.

The value of the digital currency Ether could surpass Bitcoin’s value by 2018, some experts say.

The Washington Post takes a look at how the NBA is doing a particularly good job of leveraging social media and technology in general to market itself to younger fans and international consumers.

A judge in Israel ruled in favor of a landlord who took down a rental ad based on his belief that a couple wanted to rent his apartment after they sent him a text message containing festive emoji and otherwise expressing interest in the rental. The landlord brought a lawsuit against the couple for backing out on the deal, and the court held the emoji in the couple’s text “convey[ed] great optimism.” The court further determined that, although the message “did not constitute a binding contract between the parties, [it] naturally led to the Plaintiff’s great reliance on the defendants’ desire to rent his apartment.” For a survey of U.S. courts’ treatment of emoji entered into evidence, read this post on Socially Aware.

The owner of a recipe site is suing the Food Network for copyright infringement, alleging that a video the network posted on its Facebook page ripped off her how-to video for snow globe cupcakes.

Twitter’s popularity with journalists has made it a prime target for media manipulators, The New York Times’s Farhad Manjoo reports. As a result, Manjoo claims, the microblogging platform played a key role in many of the past year’s biggest misinformation campaigns.

The Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University claims that the @realDonaldTrump Twitter account’s blocking of some Twitter users violates the First Amendment because it suppresses speech in a public forum protected by the Constitution.

Pop singer Taylor Swift, who pulled her back catalogue of music from free streaming services in 2014 saying the services don’t fairly compensate music creators, has now made her entire catalogue of music accessible via Spotify, Google Play and Amazon Music.

To encourage young people in swing constituencies to vote for Labour in the UK’s general election, some Tinder users turned their profiles over to a bot that sent other Tinder users between the ages of 18 and 25 automated messages asking if they were voting and focusing on key topics that would interest young voters.

GettyImages-484516083_SMALLFor the third year in a row, Socially Aware co-editor Aaron Rubin and I attended SXSW Interactive, which arguably has become the premier annual gathering for the global tech community. But this year, SXSW Interactive had a very different vibe to it than in the prior two years.

In the past, a spirit of boundless optimism infused the event. A sense existed that there is no problem that could not be solved through technological innovation.

Indeed, at SXSW Interactive last year, President Obama—who was rapturously received by the audience—touched on this “can do” spirit in his keynote address:

“So the reason I’m here really is to recruit all of you. It’s to say to you as I’m about to leave office, how can we start coming up with new platforms, new ideas, new approaches across disciplines and across skill sets to solve some of the big problems that we’re facing today.”

What a difference a year can make. Perhaps it was due in part to the weather—overcast, wet and cold—but a pessimistic mood seemed to hang over this year’s edition of SXSW Interactive. Continue Reading Gloom Descends on This Year’s SXSW Interactive

Twitter is suing the Department of Homeland Security in an attempt to void a summons demanding records that would identify the creator of an anti-Trump Twitter account.

Facebook has joined the fight against the nonconsensual dissemination of sexually explicit photos online—content known as “revenge porn”—by having specially trained employees review images flagged by users and using photo-matching technologies to help stop revenge porn images from being shared on the company’s apps and platforms.

Amid its own revenge porn scandal, the U.S. Marines Corps has expanded its social media policy to clarify how military code can be used to prosecute members’ offensive or disrespectful online activities.

A Minnesota judge has ordered Google to disclose all searches for the name of the victim of a wire-fraud crime worth less than $30,000.

Scientists are studying the use of emoji in human interactions, marketing campaigns and business transactions. Here at Socially Aware we’ve taken a look at the difficulty that courts have had in evaluating the meaning of emoji in connection with contract, tort and other legal claims.

Did the White House’s social media director violate the Hatch Act with a tweet?

In the interest of maintaining big-spending advertisers’ business, Google is trying to teach computers the nuances of what makes content objectionable.

The upcoming desktop version of the popular mobile dating app Tinder, Tinder Online, prompts users to talk more and swipe less.

One jet-setting couple with a combined three million Instagram followers is earning between $3,000 and $9,000 per post.

The New York Times’s Brian Chen walks readers through some of the most worthwhile apps and tech gadgets in the pet-care category.

Google unveiled a new tool designed to combat toxic speech online by assessing the language commenters use, as opposed to the ideas they express.

Is a state law banning sex offenders from social media unconstitutional? Based on their comments during oral arguments in Packingham v. North Carolina, some U.S. Supreme Court justices may think so.

Facebook is implementing a feature that uses artificial intelligence to identify posts reflecting suicidal inclinations.

Facebook Analytics for Apps reached a significant milestone: It now supports more than 1 million apps.

So did YouTube, which recently surpassed 1 billion hours of video per day.

As many as 15% of regular social media usersthat is, people, not businesses—are buying “likes” on social media?!

The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct’s warning to judges about their use of social media was prompted by this case in which a St. Lawrence County town judge used Facebook to criticize the prosecution of a town council candidate.

More than 40% of Americans incessantly check their gadgets for new messages and social media status updates, and it might be making them a little crazy.

University of Manchester researchers have developed a computer that is faster than any other because its processors are made of DNA, which allows the computer to replicate itself.

Mobile marketers can significantly increase the open rates of their push notifications by doing one simple thing: including emojis.

A woman whose “starter marriage” was covered by the New York Times wedding announcements section in 1989 might have been spared some angst if the United States had a Right to Be Forgotten, as Europe does.

New York City’s Conflicts of Interest Board has issued guidelines prohibiting elected officials from using official social media accounts for political purposes or having their staff draft content for their personal social media accounts.

Congress has begun paving the way for the deployment of autonomous vehicles.

Twitter has begun temporarily limiting its account features for users the company identifies as abusive.

Google Maps now allows users to create lists and share them with followers.

U.S. and Canadian companies can post job openings to their Facebook pages for free.

Thanks to millennials, online chat rooms are making a comeback.

With Tinder’s acquisition of the video-sharing startup called Wheel, video dating is likely in store for a revival, too.

Yelp will be offering a new feature that allows users to ask questions about a venue.

Reportedly used by political operatives ranging from White House staffers to EPA workers, encrypted messaging apps have become popular in Washington—and it’s raising legal questions.

Warren Buffet is getting into the wearables game.

Some tips for small businesses on how to manage a social media presence.

Over 30 workers at a Japanese insurance company are losing their jobs following the company’s adoption of IBM’s Watson Explorer, an artificial intelligence system that will perform an important back office function at the company.

Medium laid off a big chunk of its team despite reporting impressive growth last year.

Snapchat is being sued by one of its former employees for allegedly terminating his employment and ruining his reputation in retaliation for whistleblowing.

In France, a new law requires companies to limit the time their employees are expected to respond to work-related email.

A college student in New York, one of the few states that hasn’t adopted an anti-revenge-porn law, is seeking an injunction that would require Yahoo, Google and Bing to remove her full name from their search engines, which generate more than four pages of X-rated references when a user enters her name into them.

Some children’s rights advocates think a Texas bill intended to help stop cyberbullying goes too far.

Lots of consumers are discovering products on social media, but most of them aren’t purchasing products directly off of those platforms—yet.

Trolls can undermine brands’ social media marketing efforts—unless their social media managers are as savvy as the person in charge of Wendy’s Twitter account.

Speaking of brands on social media, Cinnabon’s Carrie Fisher tweet stirred up some controversy.

Facebook temporarily banned Santa Claus’s account over the holidays.

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) has filed suit to overturn a law that requires the popular entertainment website to remove the ages or birth dates of people in the entertainment industry upon request.

Vine might not be history after all.

Twitter users posted more than one billion election-related tweets between the first presidential debate and Election Day.

Facebook is testing a feature that allows company Page administrators to post job ads and receive applications from candidates.

People who create or encourage others to use “derogatory hashtags” on social media could be prosecuted in England and Wales.

A new “tried it” checkmark on pins will allow Pinterest users to share the products and projects they’ve purchased or attempted.

Did social media ads allow political campaigns to circumvent state laws prohibiting the visible promotion of candidates within a certain distance of polling places?

The Eight Circuit held that a college has the right to expel a student from its nursing program for inappropriate social media posts about his classmates, including the suggestion that he would inflict on one of them a “hemopneumothorax”—a lung puncture.

Law enforcement officials are increasing their use of social media to locate missing persons.

An unemployed single mother in California is facing several misdemeanor charges for selling her ceviche over social media.

Coming soon to a vending machine near you: Snapchat Spectacles (but only if you live in a densely populated area like New York or Los Angeles).

Social media analytics firms claim that social media did a better job at predicting Trump’s win than the polls.

The Internet of Things is apparently to blame for the Web outage that paralyzed the online world earlier this month.

Justin Timberlake took down his “ballot selfie” from Instagram after Tennessee authorities made clear that it was illegal.

Presumably in order to help facilitate compliance with guidance from regulators in the United States, United Kingdom and elsewhere, YouTube is making available to video creators an easy-to-use “sponsored content” notification that they can opt to have appear during the first few seconds of their videos.

Will blockchain technology be the next big wave of disruption for the music industry?

With Tinder’s new feature, online daters can be sure their profiles feature the photos most likely to get right-swipes.

When the chief digital officer at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art lost his job, he turned to social media for advice.

The NFL’s new social media policy promises to impose hefty fines on member teams that post videos or animated GIFs of games, or use Facebook Live or Periscope to stream anything in the stadium.

When a Russian tech entrepreneur’s friend died, she used artificial intelligence and his old text messages to create a futuristic memorial.

Employed but curious about new job opportunities? Now you can change your LinkedIn profile to secretly signal to recruiters that you’re in the market for a new gig.

Guess what percentage of Americans one researcher predicts will own a virtual reality headset in 2016?

Could Google Flights be the ticket to finding the best possible fare to your 2016 winter holiday destination?

Facebook at Work, the on-the-job version of the web’s most popular social media platform, will launch in London on October 10th.

Add iHeartRadio to the list of Internet radio platforms that will be offering an on demand music streaming service.

California law will be updated to explicitly prohibit drivers from browsing social media or taking selfies (or other photos) while they’re behind the wheel.

Should you download Allo, Google’s new messaging app?

Florida appeals court: A student’s tweet stating that he “can’t WAIT to shoot up [his] school” is not a criminal threat under Florida law.

Available to consumers later this fall, Snapchat’s Spectacles are already raising the kinds of privacy concerns that plagued Google Glass.

Will artificial intelligence and robots eliminate millions of jobs? Not if these five tech giants can help it.

A tool is being developed to help law enforcement scan Twitter for signs of impending hate crime.

Meetup redesigned its mobile apps and website.

A rumination on cyberbullying, online anonymity and the dark side of human nature.

The California Supreme Court agreed to hear Yelp’s case arguing that requiring the company to remove a one-star review of a law firm “creates a gaping hole” in the immunity that shields internet service providers from suits related to user-generated content.

Images, videos and quoted tweets no longer count toward Twitter’s 140-charter limit.

Google is undertaking cutting-edge efforts to battle online trolls.

Only 28 websites are registered under North Korea’s top level .kp domain.

Chinese law enforcement agencies investigating criminal cases can now secretly request access to personal information posted on social media services.

Back here in the United States, Twitter’s bi-annual transparency report shows that between January and June the platform received 2,520 information requests from U.S. law enforcement agencies.

The Department of Transportation issued a 15-point list of safety expectations for driverless cars.

Relationship Science, a repository of information about influential people and their connections, is opening its database to everyone, a change that could put the company in competition with LinkedIn.

Content marketers need to publish how many articles a week to make a difference?! Sigh.

Building an audience on Snapchat seems pretty arduous, too.

Concerned that your identity may have been stolen in some of the major hacking attacks in the last three years? Take this quiz to learn your minimum level of exposure and what you can do about it.

The five most popular bots on Botlist last week.