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Socially Aware Blog The Law and Business of Social Media

Category Archives: Disappearing Content

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Social Links: Yellow journalism rakes in cash; NYC law protects gig economy pay; Twitter suspends “alt-right” accounts

Posted in Disappearing Content, Free Speech, Mobile, Online Reviews

“Yellow journalism” websites are using social media to capitalize on popular ideology. And they’re making a bundle. New York City recently passed the country’s first law protecting the wages of “gig economy” workers. The Wall Street Journal published an illuminating infographic illustrating who’s making a living that way. Twitter suspended high-profile accounts associated with the… Continue Reading

Social Links: Twitter offers anti-harassment tools; Pinterest takes on video ads; P&G changes its social strategy

Posted in Advertising, Cyberbullying, Disappearing Content, First Amendment, Litigation, Marketing

Twitter took steps to remedy its harassment problem. In addition, over the last six months, Twitter suspended 235,000 accounts that promoted terrorism. The Washington Post is using language-generation technology to automatically produce stories on the Olympics and the election. Video ads are going to start popping up on Pinterest. Does it make sense for big… Continue Reading

Social Links: Twitter’s tough quarter; Yelp warns users about litigious dentist; Pinterest battles Snapchat

Posted in Advertising, Digital Content, Disappearing Content, Marketing, Mobile

Instagram now allows celebrities to block trolls. While Facebook reached new highs last quarter, Twitter continued to stumble. Will adding more live video content or allowing users to create Snapchat-like collage custom emojis over photos help Twitter regain its footing? Tips for fixing your company’s social media marketing strategy. A pop singer told fans to… Continue Reading

Social Links: Twitter’s troll problem; Snapchat fat-shamer risks prosecution; a federal anti-revenge-porn law?

Posted in Cyberbullying, Disappearing Content, First Amendment, Free Speech, Litigation, Livestreaming, Mobile, Privacy, Protected Speech

Facebook Messenger joins the elite “one billion monthly users” club just four years after its release as a standalone app. A Canadian judge ordered a couple convicted of child neglect to post to all their social media accounts his decision describing their crime. Leslie Jones of Ghostbusters highlights Twitter’s trolling problem. One tech columnist says… Continue Reading

Social Links: Kids roll eyes as parents embrace Snapchat; teen sues Snapchat over sexual content; Snapchat to become less ephemeral with new “Memories” feature (plus some other news not involving Snapchat)

Posted in Asia, Disappearing Content, E-Commerce, Litigation, Livestreaming, Marketing, Privacy

Snapchat has caught on with “oldies” (that’s people 35 and older, FYI). Facebook Messenger is testing “Secret” mode, a feature that allows some messages to be read only by the recipient. A South Korean copy of Snapchat has taken off in Asia. Using social media to help promote your brand? Here’s a list of top… Continue Reading

Social Links: Social’s potential to upend the investment industry; online ad fraud; a proposal to fix Twitter

Posted in Advertising, Compliance, Digital Content, Disappearing Content, Endorsement Guides, Ethics, Fraud, FTC, Marketing

Social media has upended a number of industries. Is Wall Street next? Facebook is getting into the video game live-streaming business. Steven Avery’s defense attorney is keeping her 163,000 Twitter followers abreast of her ongoing defense work on behalf of the “Making a Murderer” documentary subject, and some lawyers think it’s a bad idea. Five quick and… Continue Reading

Social Links: The rise of social news; how technology hijacks our attention; are websites a dying business?

Posted in Compliance, Cyberbullying, Digital Content, Disappearing Content, European Union

In a fascinating, must-read article, a Google design ethicist explains the techniques that engineers and entrepreneurs employ to keep us hooked on the web. A majority of U.S. adults—62%—now get their news on social media. An apartment complex in Utah is trying to force its residents to “friend” the complex. Will the next head of… Continue Reading

Social Links—Fines for social-media-posting jurors; Microinfluencers; Snapchat’s and Tinder’s sketchy new features

Posted in Advertising, Disappearing Content, Litigation, Privacy

A lawsuit alleges this Snapchat feature is making driving even more dangerous, and it’s not texting or instant messaging. This state is considering imposing hefty fines on jurors who post information to social media about the lawsuits they’re hearing. Facebook pulls back the veil (ever so slightly) on political ads. The exposure of the personal… Continue Reading

Our List of Lists

Posted in Compliance, Disappearing Content, E-Commerce, Livestreaming, Marketing, Privacy, Wearable Computers

January is the month when lists—lists of predictions, lists of trends, lists of feats and lists of failures—pervade social media newsfeeds and publications’ headlines. Here at Socially Aware we’re making an annual tradition of curating a “List of Lists”—an inventory of the roundups that we think will be of most interest to our readership. We’ll update… Continue Reading

Building a Successful Social Media App: Four Lessons Learned From Snapchat

Posted in Disappearing Content

Since its launch in 2011, the social media platform Snapchat has generated its share of negative press, with most of that press in some way related to the very characteristic that, at least initially, helped Snapchat to become popular among its mostly youthful user base: its “disappearing” messages feature. Yet, despite reports that the app… Continue Reading

Status Updates: Facebook Posts—Reliable Evidence?; Quora Post Costs Applicant a Job; a New Ephemeral Messaging App

Posted in Disappearing Content, Discovery, E-Discovery, Litigation, Status Updates

Facebook: Fact or fiction? These days, courts are more and more frequently faced with disputes over whether, as part of the discovery process, a litigant should be entitled to view the opposing party’s social media posts. As we’ve discussed, some courts deciding physical and emotional injury claims have held that the photos and status updates… Continue Reading