A nice overview of the rules on researching jurors’ social media accounts in various jurisdictions from Law.com.

The importance of appearing at the top of Google search results, especially on mobile devices, is driving retailers to spend more and more on the search engine’s product listing ads, which include not just text but also the photos of products.

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology designed a mobile robot that 3D-printed a building that is 50-feet-wide in 14 hours.

In the second half of 2016, Facebook received 9% more global government requests for users’ account data and—largely because users had stopped posting images of the 2015 Paris terrorist attack victims’ remains, which was against French law—28% fewer global government requests to remove content that violates local law.

After Kashmiris posted photos and videos depicting alleged military abuse in the days following a violence-plagued local election, authorities in the Indian-controlled region banned 22 social media sites, claiming it was necessary to restore order.

At the UEFA Champions League final in Cardiff, Wales, this summer, British police will pilot a new automated facial recognition (AFR) system to scan the faces of attendees and compare them to a police “persons of interest” database.

To show concerned citizens—and criminals—that they mean business, police in an Alabama city are live-broadcasting arrests on Twitter.

The data collected by the physical-activity-tracking device worn by a Connecticut murder victim contradicts the timeline of events given by her husband, a suspect.

One of the Kardashians is being sued by a photo agency for allegedly copying a copyrighted photo of her and posting it to her Instagram account.

And on the subject of user-generated content, owners of video content that is posted by users to Facebook without authorization can now claim ad earnings for the infringing content and set automated rules that will determine when infringing content should be blocked.

The editor of the MIT Technology Review provided interesting insights to Chatbots Magazine regarding the future and current state of artificial intelligence.

Police in Silicon Valley arrested a man for allegedly knocking down a 300-pound security robot while he was intoxicated.

Instagram now allows users to hide offensive comments posted to their feeds. Take that trolls!

Soon you’ll be able to watch Twitter content like NFL Thursday Night Football on a Twitter app on Apple TV, Xbox One and Amazon Fire TV.

“Ballot selfie” laws—laws that prohibit posting online photos of completed election ballots—are being challenged in Michigan and New Hampshire.

Google may be recording you regularly.

YouTube content creators can now communicate with their followers in real time.

AdBlock Plus has launched a service that allows website operators to display “acceptable” ads to visitors using the popular ad blocking software. Irony, anyone?

The EU might soon require the same things of chat apps like Skype that it requires of telecom businesses.

A controversial proposal aims to give the EU’s 500 million consumers more digital streaming content choices.

An Austrian teen whose parents overshared on social media looks to the law for recourse.

Baltimore County officials warned government employees to watch what they say on social media.

With so many alternative content providers around these days, why do we still watch so much TV?

Here’s a list of 50 Snapchat marketing influencers who Mashable says are worth following.

Facebook Messenger joins the elite “one billion monthly users” club just four years after its release as a standalone app.

A Canadian judge ordered a couple convicted of child neglect to post to all their social media accounts his decision describing their crime.

Leslie Jones of Ghostbusters highlights Twitter’s trolling problem. One tech columnist says the platform needs to rethink its application programming interface strategy to enable users and communities to insulate themselves from abuse.

Don’t drive and Facebook Live.

Google erased Dennis Cooper’s 14-year-old blog without warning or explanation. We recently examined the outcome of lawsuits challenging a platform’s right to remove user content (spoiler alert: the platforms usually win).

Twitter now lets anyone apply to get verified.

Researchers say there’s a correlation between an increase in the psychological stress that teens suffer and the amount of time they’re spending on social media.

A Playboy model who “fat-shamed” a woman by photographing her and posting it to Snapchat risks prosecution.

Forensic psychologists explain why people post evidence of their crimes to social media.

We may soon have a federal law making revenge porn illegal. Our blog post from 2014 took a look at some of the legal issues raised by revenge porn.

There’s now a dating app that sets people up on Pokémon Go dates. Want to know more about the most popular mobile game of all time? Read our Pokémon Go Business and Legal Primer.

The UK wants to use the blockchain to track the spending of welfare recipients.

Some believe that a recent Ninth Circuit holding could turn sharing passwords into a federal crime under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

And another Ninth Circuit opinion sided with Facebook in a closely-watched case interpreting the same federal law, this time involving unauthorized access to Facebook’s website.

The fashion world is embroiled in a rocky romance with social media.

Snapchat filed a patent application for image-recognition technology that may help the platform’s ad sales.

Scientists think they’ve found a way to tackle virtual reality sickness.

What’s going on at Vine? First a bunch of influencers cut ties with the platform. Now a group of its top executives have jumped ship.

Livestreaming services are giving cable TV networks a run for their money.

You didn’t think we’d ignore the Pokémon Go craze, did you? Here’s advice on how to protect your privacy when you’re using the app. We’re also preparing an article describing the game and the business and legal issues that are arising from it. Stay tuned.

Snapchat has caught on with “oldies” (that’s people 35 and older, FYI).

Facebook Messenger is testing “Secret” mode, a feature that allows some messages to be read only by the recipient.

A South Korean copy of Snapchat has taken off in Asia.

Using social media to help promote your brand? Here’s a list of top Facebook marketers and some advice on how to get your customers to make social platforms their point of purchase.

Meet MikMak, the mobile shopping network that sells via video.

A 14-year-old and his mother are suing Snapchat, claiming the app regularly exposes him to sexually explicit content.

Dieters are flocking to Instagram.

Twitter is looking to ink more NFL-style streaming deals.

Young performers are trying to achieve stardom by broadcasting on apps, such as YouNow. Perhaps they should go old school, and follow this advice on building the perfect YouTube channel.

The Wall Street Journal profiles Instagram’s founder, Kevin Systrom.

China is reportedly launching a crackdown on “fake news” spread on social media sites.

Snapchat’s new feature, “Memories,” will allow users to retain some content.

Facebook signs more than $50 million worth of deals with media firms and celebrities to create videos for its live-streaming service.

Tumblr is jumping on the live video bandwagon, too—but via live-streaming platform partners, not through its own service.

C-Span picked up live feeds of the Democratic sit-in over gun-control legislation that representatives shot on Periscope, Facebook Live and other social platforms.

Twitter will now let you see when tweets are from a specific place, like a business, sports stadium, or music festival.

Is Snapchat on its way to becoming the first “social augmented reality platform”?

An Orlando prosecutor was fired for posting offensive statements about the city on social media shortly after the Pulse nightclub shooting.

A guy in Australia faces three years in jail for “criminal trolling.

After a judge running for re-election commented on a case he was presiding over on his campaign page on Facebook, the New Mexico Supreme Court issued guidance for judges on social media use.

Social Times explains why Lego’s social media marketing efforts are worth emulating.

Twitter launched a standalone app designed to help famous people interact with their fans and build a bigger following.

Speaking of celebrities, here’s a list of seven movie stars who refuse to participate in social media.

Here’s how Twitter is loosening up its 140-character limit.

The federal government will now check the social media history of prospective employees before granting them security clearance.

One expert says C-level executives shouldn’t entrust millennials with their companies’ social media feeds.

Federal court refuses to dismiss a lawsuit against Google for allegedly removing sites from its search engine results.

Before a larceny arrest, a “cry for help” on Facebook.

Do strong social media campaigns really beget successful brands, or is it the other way around?

A lawyer representing students suing Google is questioning the impartiality of the federal judge hearing the case because the judge was just hired by this unrelated tech giant.

The New York Times live streamed one of its pitch meetings on Facebook Live, and not everyone thinks it was a great idea.

Some social media marketing satire, courtesy of The Onion.

The Great Instagram Logo Freakout of 2016.

A UK council policy reportedly grants its members power to spy on residents by setting up fake Facebook profiles.

Guess who spends more of their workday on social media, women or men?

Lessons from one of YouTube’s first (and most successful) stars.

Should sharing tragic images on social media be against the law?

A team of Google employees proposed adding new emojis to represent women in professional situations.

Has social media forced everyone to brand themselves?

Nearly 500 startup companies offer tech solutions for the legal industry.

Using social media to speed up organ donation.

Suicide on Periscope prompts France to open inquiry.

Now an online service helps people to prepare their “digital legacy.” Will the “social media assets after death” issue never die? (Sorry, we couldn’t resist.)

Study finds social media manipulation is the most common form of sextortion.

January is the month when lists—lists of predictions, lists of trends, lists of feats and lists of failures—pervade social media newsfeeds and publications’ headlines. Here at Socially Aware we’re making an annual tradition of curating a “List of Lists”—an inventory of the roundups that we think will be of most interest to our readership.

We’ll update this page throughout the month as additional pertinent content is published.

Happy 2016!

Apps

The 100 Best iPhone Apps of 2016

The 100 Best Android Apps of 2016

Social Media (General)

What’s ahead for social media in 2016?

11 pivotal social media trends for 2016

Social Media Trends 2016

Virtual Reality Takes Off and 4 Other Social Media Trends in 2016

Social Media Sites You’ll Be Seeing More of in 2016

Beyond Twitter: The Other Social Media Platforms 2016 Candidates Are Using

Social Media Content

Top 10 social media misfires of 2015

Top Social Media Stories of 2015

Twitter’s Top Social Media Moments of 2015

Digital & Social Media Marketing

Five things great brands will do differently on social media in 2016

20 Things Social Media Professionals Can’t Ignore In 2016

Skills Social Media Managers Will Need in 2016

From Likes To Tweets: Marketing Land’s Top Social Media Marketing Columns Of 2015

10 Steps To Improve Your 2016 Social Media ROI

21 Content Marketing Predictions for 2016

Legal Tech

The 10 Most Important Legal Technology Developments of 2015

4 Legal Tech Trends To Watch For In 2016

What Technologies Will Most Affect Big Law in 2016?

Startups

146 Startup Failure Post-Mortems

15 interesting startups to watch in 2016

10 Business Trends for 2016 Success

Tech, Privacy and Social Media Law

Five Privacy and Security Stories That Mattered in 2015

Wired.com’s Predictions on the Intersection of Technology and the Law in 2016

Tech trends 2016: Cybersecurity in the connected world

 

 

150728SociallyAware_Page_01The latest issue of our Socially Aware newsletter is now available here.

In this issue of Socially Aware, our Burton Award-winning guide to the law and business of social media, we present a “grand unifying theory” of today’s leading technologies and the legal challenges these technologies raise; we discuss whether hashtags can be protected under trademark law; we explore the status of social media accounts in bankruptcy; we examine the growing tensions between content owners and users of livestreaming apps like Meerkat and Periscope; we highlight a recent discovery dispute involving a deactivated Facebook account; we discuss a bill before Congress that would protect consumers’ rights to post negative reviews on websites like Yelp; and we take a look at the Federal Trade Commission’s crackdown on in-store tracking activities.

All this—plus an infographic exploring the popularity of livestreaming sites Meerkat and Periscope.

Read our newsletter.