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Socially Aware Blog The Law and Business of Social Media

Tag Archives: E-commerce

Status Updates

Posted in Status Updates

Completely liable? A Hong Kong court has found that Google may be liable for defamation based on the words that it used to “auto-complete” a person’s name in a search. In this case, the words that were added implied that the subject of the search was a member of an organized crime group. But Google’s… Continue Reading

Status Updates

Posted in Status Updates

A relatively new site called Wanelo combines the features of a social media site and an e-commerce site by permitting users to “save” products that they are interested in, and showing them to their online friends. The site now claims a 50 percent saturation rate among college-age women. In a dramatic and tragic case in… Continue Reading

UK: The Latest Social Media Legal Updates

Posted in E-Commerce, Litigation

In our May 30, 2012 post on the Socially Aware blog—“Should We All Be Getting the Twitter “Jitters”? Be Careful What You Say Online (Particularly in the United Kingdom)”—we considered a variety of UK laws being used to regulate the content of tweets and other online messages. Since that post, there has been a series… Continue Reading

E-Commerce Providers Take Note: New York’s Highest Court Upholds “Amazon” Sales Tax Statute

Posted in E-Commerce, Litigation

On March 28, 2013, the Court of Appeals, New York’s highest court, issued a decision in Overstock.com, Inc. & Amazon.com, LLC, et al., holding that New York’s “click-through nexus” statute does not violate the Commerce Clause or the Due Process Clause of the U.S. Constitution. As a result, an Internet vendor may be presumed to have… Continue Reading

You Can’t Make a Square Peg Fit in a Round Hole: California Supreme Court Holds Online Purchases of Electronically Downloadable Products Outside Scope of Song-Beverly Act

Posted in Litigation, Privacy

Handing a victory to online retailers, on February 4, 2013, the California Supreme Court held in a split decision that online transactions involving electronically downloadable products fall outside the scope of the Song-Beverly Credit Card Act (Apple v. Superior Court (Krescent), S199384). Despite acknowledging the unique fraud issues present in online transactions, the Court refused… Continue Reading