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Socially Aware Blog The Law and Business of Social Media

Tag Archives: LinkedIn

Status Updates

Posted in Status Updates

Big Brother isn’t just watching. A single mother in upstate New York was surprised to find that she had a Facebook page in her name, complete with photos of her, her son, and her niece. She hadn’t actually set up the page. It turned out that she was being investigated as a bit player in… Continue Reading

Status Updates

Posted in Status Updates

Where are the CEOs? According to a new study, fully two-thirds of the CEOs of the Fortune 500 have no personal social media presence at all. And of the ones who do participate in social media, two-thirds use only one of the major networks, usually LinkedIn.  Just 42 of the senior executives have Twitter accounts,… Continue Reading

Status Updates

Posted in Status Updates

May a lawyer ethically instruct a client to delete potentially damaging information from a client’s Facebook page? According to a new ethics opinion from the Philadelphia Bar Association, yes, so long as the information is preserved in some way, should it become relevant to the case. The opinion also determined that, under the Pennsylvania Rules… Continue Reading

Status Updates

Posted in Status Updates

Since launching its Google+ social network three years ago, Google has insisted that Google+ users use only their real names on the network — no pseudonyms.  Perhaps in an effort to attract more users to Google+, the company has now abandoned its real-name policy — but has this change arrived too late to have an impact? Airbnb,… Continue Reading

Recent UK Court Rulings on Employees’ Use of LinkedIn

Posted in Employment Law, Litigation, Terms of Use, UK High Court

Following our post on U.S. lawsuits concerning the ownership of LinkedIn and Twitter accounts, we report on a recent United Kingdom High Court ruling that considered who was entitled to operate four LinkedIn Groups, and other UK cases that have addressed related issues. Before we describe the High Court’s ruling, it is important to provide… Continue Reading

Is Your Account Tweeting Without You Knowing It? Twitter Upgrades to Two-Factor Authentication

Posted in Privacy

On April 15, 2013, the Associated Press’s Twitter account reported that President Obama had been injured in an explosion at the White House. Within seconds of the announcement, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plummeted more than 150 points. Fortunately, the President’s Press Secretary quickly confirmed that the President was unharmed and, soon after, the Associated… Continue Reading

Stop Insider Tweeting!—Feds Eye Social Media for Securities Shenanigans

Posted in Financial Institutions, SEC, Securities Law

Article courtesy of Morrison & Foerster’s MoFo Tech As financial institutions and investors turn to social media to instantly share snippets of news and potential clues about market trends, the FBI and SEC are monitoring such postings for evidence of insider trading and improper investment information. Companies must comply with pre-Internet federal securities laws covering… Continue Reading

Can Touting Your New Job on Social Media Sites Violate a Non-Solicitation Agreement?

Posted in Litigation

According to a federal judge in Oklahoma in Pre-Paid Legal Services, Inc. v. Cahill, simply sharing information about a new job over social media does not mean that you are inviting former co-workers to come join you in violation of a non-solicitation agreement. On February 12, 2013, U.S. District Court Judge James Payne of the… Continue Reading

Watch What You Tweet: Proposed Social Media Guidance for Financial Institutions

Posted in Financial Institutions, Privacy

With the explosive growth of social media, consumers increasingly expect to be able to interact online with the companies from which they buy goods and services. As a result, financial institutions have begun to explore the use of social media, both to strengthen relationships with existing customers and to attract new ones. Financial institutions, however,… Continue Reading

Socially Aware Looks Back: The Social Media Law Year in Review

Posted in Employment Law, Litigation, Privacy

2012 was a momentous year for social media law. We’ve combed through the court decisions, the legislative initiatives, the regulatory actions and the corporate trends to identify what we believe to be the ten most significant social media law developments of the past year–here they are, in no particular order: Bland v. Roberts – A… Continue Reading

Which Side Are You On? Employers and Employees Battle Over Ownership of Social Media Accounts

Posted in Litigation

When an employee uses a social media account to promote his or her company, who keeps that account when the employee leaves? Perhaps more importantly, who keeps the friends, followers and connections associated with that account? Three lawsuits highlight the challenges an employer may face in seeking to gain control of work-related social media accounts… Continue Reading

The Social Media Experiment: Challenges for Broker-Dealers and Investment Advisers

Posted in Financial Institutions, Investment Management Law, Securities Law

The announcement by a Wall Street firm that it plans to give its financial advisers limited access to social media websites has been viewed by many as inevitable.  Morgan Stanley’s foray into the fast-changing world of social media highlights the difficulties faced by broker-dealers and investment advisers and the regulators who oversee them.  As more… Continue Reading

Tracking the Trackers: Social Media Companies Face Pressure for Tracking Users’ Browsing Habits

Posted in Privacy

Facebook is facing renewed scrutiny following efforts to explain its data collection practices, which include tracking where and when members and nonmembers are browsing after they visit a Facebook page. At the end of 2011, USA Today reported on how Facebook tracks user browsing habits, following in-depth interviews with senior Facebook engineers and spokespersons. According… Continue Reading

You’re Out of Order: Jurors, Social Media and Legal Ethics

Posted in Ethics

The Internet and, in particular, social media have changed the landscape of federal and state jury instructions, which now prohibit jurors from conducting independent research on the Internet, from sending emails, texts, Facebook postings, tweets or other electronic communications conveying developments in a trial or in deliberations, and from using mobile cameras to record courtroom… Continue Reading