CaptureThe latest issue of our Socially Aware newsletter is now available here.

In this issue of Socially Aware, our Burton Award winning guide to the law and business of social media, we take a look at courts’ efforts to evaluate emoticons and emojis entered into evidence; we describe the novel way one court addressed whether counsel may conduct Internet research on jurors; we examine a recent decision finding that an employee handbook provision requiring employees to maintain a positive work environment violates the National Labor Relations Act; we discuss an FTC settlement highlighting legal risks in using social media “influencers” to promote products and services; we explore the threat ad blockers pose to the online publishing industry; we review a decision holding that counsel may face discipline for accessing opposing parties’ private social media accounts; we discuss a federal court opinion holding that the online posting of copyrighted material alone is insufficient to support personal jurisdiction under New York’s long-arm statute; and we summarize regulatory guidance applicable to social media competitions in the UK.

All this—plus an infographic illustrating the growing popularity of emoticons and emojis.

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