In February the U.S Supreme Court heard oral arguments in United States v. MicrosoftAt issue is Microsoft’s challenge to a warrant issued by a U.S. court directing it to produce emails stored in Ireland. With implications for government investigations, privacy law, and multi-national tech companies’ ability to compete globally, the case has attracted significant attention.

Over the course of the oral arguments it became clear that rendering a decision in United States v. Microsoft would require the justices to choose between two less-than-satisfactory outcomes: denying the U.S. government access to necessary information, or potentially harming U.S. technology companies’ ability to operate globally.

The conundrum the justices face is largely due to the fact that the 1986 law at issue, the Stored Communications Act (SCA), never envisioned the kind of complex, cross-border data storage practices of today.

Find out more about the case and how recently introduced legislation known as the CLOUD Act could wind up superseding the Court’s decision in United States v. Microsoft by, among other things, clarifying the SCA’s applicability to foreign-stored data while also providing technology companies with a new vehicle for challenging certain orders that conflict with the laws of the country where data is stored.

Read my article in Wired.