A nice overview of the rules on researching jurors’ social media accounts in various jurisdictions from Law.com.

The importance of appearing at the top of Google search results, especially on mobile devices, is driving retailers to spend more and more on the search engine’s product listing ads, which include not just text but also the photos of products.

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology designed a mobile robot that 3D-printed a building that is 50-feet-wide in 14 hours.

In the second half of 2016, Facebook received 9% more global government requests for users’ account data and—largely because users had stopped posting images of the 2015 Paris terrorist attack victims’ remains, which was against French law—28% fewer global government requests to remove content that violates local law.

After Kashmiris posted photos and videos depicting alleged military abuse in the days following a violence-plagued local election, authorities in the Indian-controlled region banned 22 social media sites, claiming it was necessary to restore order.

At the UEFA Champions League final in Cardiff, Wales, this summer, British police will pilot a new automated facial recognition (AFR) system to scan the faces of attendees and compare them to a police “persons of interest” database.

To show concerned citizens—and criminals—that they mean business, police in an Alabama city are live-broadcasting arrests on Twitter.

The data collected by the physical-activity-tracking device worn by a Connecticut murder victim contradicts the timeline of events given by her husband, a suspect.

One of the Kardashians is being sued by a photo agency for allegedly copying a copyrighted photo of her and posting it to her Instagram account.

And on the subject of user-generated content, owners of video content that is posted by users to Facebook without authorization can now claim ad earnings for the infringing content and set automated rules that will determine when infringing content should be blocked.

The editor of the MIT Technology Review provided interesting insights to Chatbots Magazine regarding the future and current state of artificial intelligence.

Police in Silicon Valley arrested a man for allegedly knocking down a 300-pound security robot while he was intoxicated.

A New York State senator has introduced a bill that would make posting footage of a crime to social media with the intention of glorifying violence or becoming famous punishable by up to four years in prison and fines.

Instagram hit the 700-million-user mark.

Brands spent 60% more on social media advertising in the first quarter of 2017 than they did in the same quarter last year, a new report shows.

But savvy brands will do more to leverage social media than just buy advertising, according to a columnist in Entrepreneur. Chatbots that can interact with customers on private messaging networks and in connection with in-app purchasing are the next big things.

And while we’re on the subject of private messaging networks, Tumblr is launching its own version, called Cabana. It encourages six friends to “hang out” and watch YouTube videos together.

Pointing out the inadequacy of many celebrities’ methods of disclosing their status as paid endorsers of the products they promote on Instagram, the FTC sent a letter to 90 high-profile social media users that provides some guidance on how to fulfill the endorsement guides’ requirement that sponsored posts be identified in a “clear and conspicuous” way.

LinkedIn has updated its terms of service and privacy policy, reportedly to make way for new platform features such as identifying when other LinkedIn members are in physical proximity to you, making available “productivity bots” to assist you in interacting with members of your LinkedIn network and allowing third-party services to display your LinkedIn profile to their users.

Facial recognition systems will soon be used to identify visa holders as they leave the United States, raising civil rights questions.

The U.S. population’s political polarization isn’t a result of the rise of social media, a new working paper issued by the National Bureau of Economic Research suggests, because hyper-partisanship is most prevalent among older Americans who are less likely than other Americans to consume media online.

Without Google’s permission, Burger King ended one of its television commercials with a statement designed to automatically cause Google Assistant devices to read a list of the Whopper’s ingredients out loud.

Having passed the 1.2-billion-user mark, Facebook Messenger is now twice as popular as Instagram.

A lawsuit alleges Anheuser-Busch and one of its distributors impermissibly used a photo from a woman’s Facebook page in promotional materials for the brewer’s Natural Light beer. We addressed some of the legal risks in seeking to commercialize user-generated content in a Socially Aware blog post last year that can be found here.

And while on the topic of copyright law and social media, a much smaller California business is being sued in federal court by one of its competitors, Founder’s Creek Media, for allegedly copying a copyrighted promotional product video from a Founder’s Creek page on Facebook and using the video as an advertisement for its own, similar product.

Germany may fine social media companies up to 50 million euros ($53 million) if they fail to remove posts that contain hate speech.

A court in Egypt sentenced a lawyer who has represented torture victims to ten years in prison for criticizing that country’s government on social media.

Using the data it aggregates about its users’ whereabouts, Snapchat introduced a new feature that allows marketers to determine whether the Snapchat users who view ad campaigns on the messaging app actually wind up visiting the advertisers’ retail locations and venues (in other words, whether their Snapchat ad campaigns are actually working).

Unbeknownst to most of its users, Twitter rolled out a “dislike” button months ago—but the consequences of using it aren’t clear.

A Business Insider article identifies ten things prospective employers and recruiters should be able to tell about you immediately upon viewing your LinkedIn profile.

An eight-year-old in Ohio took his four-year-old sister for a ride to McDonald’s in his family’s van, apparently after watching driving instruction videos on YouTube.

A New Jersey court rules that state police can examine a suspect’s private social media messages without having to apply for an order under the state’s wiretapping laws.

Technology companies are exercising a lot of control ever over users’ devices remotely, and it’s implicating privacy issues.

Social media companies are reportedly considering putting up on their platforms police icons that will allow police officers in the UK to access the chats of users who click the icons when they feel threatened.

With the help of bots and cyborgs, a 68-year-old Chicago retiree posts more than 1,000 pro-Republican messages to Twitter a day.

Interested in a good, basic—but comprehensive—overview of blockchain and its potential impact that can be read in one sitting? Here it is.

Here are some tips on how brands can use social artificial intelligence to their advantage.

Weary of all the political posts in your newsfeed? Try this app.

Guess which celebrity  posted the first Instagram photo to win more than 7.2 million likes in less than 24 hours?

A robot developed by Google could be representative of how robots “look and operate in the future.” It’s also a little creepy.

Some industry observers are asking whether the post-inauguration tweets that President Trump is sending from his personal Twitter account may be subject to the same Presidential Records Act standards as official presidential communications.

Spending on mobile ads is expected to reach how much by 2021?!

Google recently banned 200 publishers from its AdSense network for either publishing fake news or impersonating real news organizations by using shortened top-level domains such as .co instead of .com.

Perhaps due in part to the fake news phenomenon, most Americans do not trust the news that they read on social media platforms, according to a recent study.

In an effort to keep users on the site, YouTube is testing an in-app messaging platform that allows users to chat about and comment on YouTube content.

Interested in how your brand can best respond to the complaints dissatisfied customers lodge on Twitter? Take a cue from Dippin’ Dots’ savvy response to the new White House Press Secretary’s multiple disses of the company’s product.

An artificially intelligent algorithm that can easily be adapted for smartphones might detect skin cancer moles as effectively as a dermatologist.

A recent study reveals that the United States has more immigrant inventors than every other country combined.

Google just made it possible to view an instantaneous Japanese-to-English translation by holding your smartphone in front of the relevant text.

These tools can help you to take a look beyond your personal social media bubble and understand how the other half thinks.

CaptureThe latest issue of our Socially Aware newsletter is now available here.

In this edition, we provide five tips for reducing potential liability exposure in seeking to exploit user-generated content; we examine a Ninth Circuit decision highlighting the control that social media platform operators have over the content and data that users post to those platforms; we discuss five questions that companies should ask themselves to help prepare for a ransomware attack; we explore a controversial California court decision that narrows an important liability safe harbor for website operators; we review a federal court decision that illustrates the importance of securing clear and affirmative assent to electronic contracts; we take a look at some recent enforcement actions that indicate a shift toward requiring clearer and potentially more burdensome disclosures from companies engaged in interest-based advertising; and  we examine a recent Northern District of California decision holding that a mobile app developer was not be liable under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act for a text initiated by one of the app’s users.

All this—plus an infographic illustrating the impact of incorporating user-generated content in marketing campaigns.

Read our newsletter.

Thumbs Up on Social Technology and Internet Set

Social media is reportedly rife with influencers promoting or reviewing products or services without disclosing compensation or other consideration that they’ve received for such endorsements. The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), the UK’s consumer protection regulator, is stepping up efforts to combat such undisclosed endorsements.

Following a ruling against an influencer marketing company, Social Chain Ltd, the CMA has warned 15 companies and 43 “social media personalities” who used Social Chain to publish content on social media that they could be in breach of UK consumer protection laws.

As we have discussed many times in Socially Aware, the advertising landscape has undergone a dramatic transformation over the past decade. The rise of social media and ever-increasing levels of Internet access across the world have made social media advertising a strong challenger to more traditional—and expensive—advertising methods, such as television advertising.

Of course, there is nothing novel in companies seeking to use celebrities to attract attention to and create excitement for their brand messages. But what has changed is the medium; when a consumer follows a celebrity on YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat or Twitter (especially a social media personality who has become famous as a result of being on YouTube, Instagram, etc.), it’s not always easy to distinguish between a genuine opinion and an advertisement. Continue Reading UK Consumer Protection Regulator Cracks Down on Undisclosed Endorsements and “Cherry Picking” Reviews on Social Media

Instagram now allows users to hide offensive comments posted to their feeds. Take that trolls!

Soon you’ll be able to watch Twitter content like NFL Thursday Night Football on a Twitter app on Apple TV, Xbox One and Amazon Fire TV.

“Ballot selfie” laws—laws that prohibit posting online photos of completed election ballots—are being challenged in Michigan and New Hampshire.

Google may be recording you regularly.

YouTube content creators can now communicate with their followers in real time.

AdBlock Plus has launched a service that allows website operators to display “acceptable” ads to visitors using the popular ad blocking software. Irony, anyone?

The EU might soon require the same things of chat apps like Skype that it requires of telecom businesses.

A controversial proposal aims to give the EU’s 500 million consumers more digital streaming content choices.

An Austrian teen whose parents overshared on social media looks to the law for recourse.

Baltimore County officials warned government employees to watch what they say on social media.

With so many alternative content providers around these days, why do we still watch so much TV?

Here’s a list of 50 Snapchat marketing influencers who Mashable says are worth following.

Recent enforcement decisions within the digital advertising industry indicate a shift in—and a clarification of—the required disclosures for companies engaged in interest-based advertising (IBA).

In particular, these decisions, taken together, indicate that an app developer’s link to its privacy policy at the point of app download may be deemed insufficient, unless the link points directly to the IBA disclosure section of the policy, or there is a clear link at the top of the policy that directs the user to that section.

Further, these decisions suggest that companies that comply with the digital advertising industry’s IBA self-regulatory principles should expressly affirm such compliance in their privacy policies.

Background

Some quick background: IBA is the collection of information about users’ online activities across different websites or mobile applications, over time, for the purpose of delivering online advertising to those users based on those activities. Although IBA is an important part of the online eco-system, if not done right, it can raise privacy concerns among consumers, who may feel that they are being spied upon by advertisers.

The Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA) has worked to ensure that IBA is done right. The DAA is a consortium of media and marketing associations that, in an effort to ward off legislation, has designed and implemented a self-regulatory compliance regime that seeks to address the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) IBA notice and choice expectations. The principles underlying this compliance regime are set out in the DAA’s Self-Regulatory Principles (“DAA Principles”). The DAA enforces these principles through the IBA accountability program, run by the Council of Better Business Bureaus and the Direct Marketing Association.

The DAA self-regulatory program is, at its heart, a notice-and-choice regime. In short, to facilitate such notice and choice, the DAA provides an advertising option icon to be placed in or near an online interest-based ad. By clicking on the icon, a consumer is sent to a landing page that describes the data collection practices associated with the ad and provides an opt-out mechanism.

Importantly, however, the DAA Principles have also been interpreted by the IBA accountability program to require “enhanced” notice on any website where information is collected for IBA purposes. In response to this interpretation, website publishers typically provide such notice in the form of an “Our Ads” or similarly named link in the site footer, separate from the privacy policy link, that clicks through to the same landing page as the advertising option icon, or to similar notice and choice information.

The Recent Decisions

In its recent enforcement actions, the IBA accountability program appears to have exported this manifestation of the enhanced notice requirement to mobile applications, notwithstanding the provisions of the DAA’s guidance on the Application of Self-Regulatory Principles to the Mobile Environment, first published in 2013.

That guidance expressly provides that app publishers (i.e., “first parties”) that permit third parties to collect information for IBA purposes must “provide a clear, meaningful, and prominent link to a disclosure that either points to a choice mechanism or setting that meets Digital Advertising Alliance specifications or individually lists such Third Parties.” This notice must be provided in two separate locations:

  • Either prior to download (e.g., in the app store on the application’s page), during download, on first opening of the app, or at the time cross-app data is first collected; and
  • In the application’s settings or any privacy policy.

The IBA accountability program appears, however, to be taking the position that a link to the privacy policy from the app store (or any other location) is not enough to meet this first prong.  That is, a “clear, meaningful, and prominent link” to the IBA disclosure must be a link directly to the IBA section of the privacy policy, in the same way that the “Our Ads” or similarly named link in the site footer clicks through to the IBA section of the privacy policy.

The IBA accountability program’s Spinrilla decision, for example, states that the accountability program could not find an “enhanced link notice separate from the privacy policy link” in the applicable app stores and affirmed that if only one privacy policy link will be used in the app store (where it is typically not possible to provide two separate links), “the link to the privacy policy must either go directly to the pertinent discussion of IBA or direct the user to that place through a clear link at the top of the privacy policy.”

The other accountability program decisions, Bearbit Studios and Top Free Games, reaffirm this interpretation. In light of these decisions, app publishers may want to revisit how they provide “enhanced notice” of their IBA practices.

Finally, the Mobile Guidance states that first parties should “indicate adherence” to the DAA Principles in their privacy policies. The accountability program decisions noted the absence of this language in the companies’ privacy policies, and the companies appear to have added language to their disclosures to comply with this obligation. Whether a company would want to affirmatively make this representation of its own accord is something that may warrant additional consideration, as the company’s failure to fully comply with such a representation could give rise to a charge of deception under Section 5 of the FTC Act or a similar state law.

The Upshot

In light of these developments, a company engaged in IBA should:

  • If engaged in IBA with respect to one or more of its apps, review how it discloses its IBA practices at the point of app download; and
  • Discuss with counsel the advisability of expressly stating adherence to the DAA Principles in its privacy policy.

 

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For background information on the DAA program and its applicability to the mobile environment, please see our earlier Socially Aware blog post, Digital Advertising Alliance Focuses on Mobile Ads. For more on consumer privacy issues generally, please see the following posts: A Warning for Websites Allowing Data Collection for Online Behavioral Advertising; FTC’s Privacy Report Suggests Tightening of Privacy Regime, Provides Guidance to Business; and Tracking the Trackers: Social Media Companies Face Pressure for Tracking Users’ Browsing Habits.

Snapchat is on track to rake in an enormous amount of ad revenue by 2017.

Also, there’s mounting evidence that the company is working toward developing a Google Glass-like product.

We have written previously about the scourge of revenge porn; it turns out the UK has a serious revenge porn problem, too.

A new law in Illinois requires social media sites to give their users the opportunity to name a beneficiary who can access their accounts if they die. Only a few other U.S. states have laws that similarly protect social media users’ digital assets.

Baltimore police use Geofeedia to monitor citizens’ social media posts, raising concerns among civil libertarians.

Now you can see when someone reads the direct message you sent on Twitter (unless, of course, the recipient disables read receipts).

According to a new study, positive comments from your friends on Facebook can bring you as much happiness as having children. Those results don’t necessarily contradict earlier studies, which found that social media users became depressed when they consumed a lot of content passively.

Are hashtags actually hurting your Twitter marketing campaigns?

Pinterest’s president predicts that media publishers eventually won’t care whether their content gets consumed on their own companies’ websites or within partner apps.

A new chatbot called Yala examines users’ time zones, social media histories and other factors to determine the most effective times to post to social media.

Will brands eventually have virtual spaces where consumers can test drive products or try on clothes?