Photo of Anthony M. Ramirez

MobilePhone_56311774_thumbnailFor corporations, the mobile app is today’s website.

Back in the late 1990s, no self-respecting company, no matter how stodgy and old-fashioned, wanted to be without a website.

Today, the same is true with mobile apps. It doesn’t matter what industry a company is in—it needs to have an app that customers and potential

IBM has been receiving rave reviews in the media for simplifying its Cloud Services Agreement to a mere two pages in length. And yes, the Agreement also boasts healthy margins and a normal font. But does the Agreement’s reasonable length equate to reasonable terms?

After all, from a customer’s perspective, shorter doesn’t necessarily mean better.

Do you still “like” me? Companies with Facebook Pages will find themselves asking that question of their followers over the next few weeks, as Facebook brings an end to the popular practice of offering discounts, exclusive content and other incentives in exchange for liking a Page.

Facebook had previously facilitated this exchange by allowing Page

Section 512 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (“DMCA”) offers various “safe harbors” to online service providers (“OSPs”) for claims of copyright infringement against them arising from certain acts of their subscribers and account holders.  Section 512 provides that in order for an OSP to qualify for the DMCA’s protections, it must satisfy certain requirements. 

Consumers often turn to the Internet for reviews before purchasing products or services, and companies are increasingly interested in ensuring that such reviews reflect positively and accurately on their businesses.  When patients post negative or allegedly inaccurate reviews about their doctors on the Internet, however, doctors are often prevented from responding due to ethical obligations