An advertising executive who lost his job after being named on an anonymous Instagram account is suing the now-defunct account for defamation. The suit names as defendants not only the account—Diet Madison Avenue, which was intended to root out harassment and discrimination at ad agencies—but also (as “Jane Doe 1,” “Jane Doe 2,” et cetera) several of the anonymous people who ran it. Whether Instagram will ultimately have to turn over the identities of the users behind the account will turn on a couple of key legal issues.

A bill recently passed by the New York State Senate makes it a crime for “a caretaker to post a vulnerable elderly person on social media without their consent.” At least one tech columnist thinks the legislation is so broadly worded that it violates the U.S. Constitution. That might be so, but—in light of several news reports about this unfortunate form of elder abuse over the last few years—that same columnist may not be correct about the bill likely having been passed in response to a one-time incident.

A new law in Egypt that categorizes social media accounts and blogs with more than 5,000 followers as media outlets allows the government in that country to block those accounts and blogs for publishing fake news. Some critics aren’t buying the government’s explanation for the law’s implementation, however, and are suggesting it was inspired by a very different motivation.

Critics of the most recent version of the European Copyright Directive’s Article 13, which the European Parliament rejected in early July, brought home their message by arguing that it would have prevented social media users from uploading and sharing their favorite memes.

In a criminal trial, social media posts may be used by both the prosecution and the defense to impeach a witness but—as with all impeachment evidence—the posts’ use and scope is entirely within the discretion of the trial court. The New York Law Journal’s cybercrime columnist explains.

To thwart rampant cheating by high school children, one country shut down the Internet nationwide during certain hours and had social media platforms go dark for the whole exam period.

Snapchat now allows users to unsend messages. Here’s how.

Employees of Burger King’s Russian division recently had to eat crow for a tasteless social media campaign that offered women a lifetime supply of Whoppers as well as three million Russian rubles ($47,000) in exchange for accomplishing a really crass feat.

We’ve all heard of drivers experiencing road rage, but how about members of the public experiencing robot rage? According to a company that supplies cooler-sized food-delivery robots, its’s a thing.

 

 

 

 

 

In order to comply with a new German law requiring social media sites to take down hate speech, Twitter and Facebook removed anti-Islamic social media posts authored by a German far-right political party.

The Obama administration’s screening of social media accounts of aspiring immigrants from majority-Muslim nations yielded little actionable intelligence, but the Trump administration is building on the practice anyway.

Over the first half of 2017, Facebook received 32,716 requests from law enforcement for user data, with 57% of those requests containing non-disclosure orders that prohibited the social media giant from notifying the user.

In other Facebook news, the social media giant is now using its facial recognition technology to notify users whenever someone posts photos of them on the platform.

Last year Twitter dealt with a variety of missteps, including failing to include women on its tech and science follow list and an incident in which a rogue Twitter employee temporarily disabled President Trump’s Twitter account. Here’s a month-by-month look back at Twitter’s tumultuous 2017.

Many YouTube celebrities’ new-subscriber and monthly-view numbers aren’t climbing nearly as fast as they once did. Possible explanations include bugs resulting from changes in YouTube’s algorithms intended to reduce inappropriate content.

Stock exchanges are testing the use of blockchain technology for mutual-fund trading, proxy voting, issuing shares in private companies and facilitating shareholder communications.

Snapchat’s disappearing message feature doesn’t prevent law enforcement from identifying the authors of threats sent using the app.

Some people are using Instagram to connect with romantic prospects, creating portfolios intended to catch the attention of desirable dating candidates and gauging and expressing interest with likes, comments and Stories views.

 

 

 

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In an effort to deter hate groups from tweeting sanitized versions of their messages, Twitter has began considering account holders’ off platform behavior when the platform evaluates whether potentially harmful tweets should be removed and account holders should be suspended or permanently banned.

In connection with Congressional efforts to deter online sex trafficking by narrowing the Communications Decency Act’s Section 230 safe harbor protection for website operators from claims arising from third-party ads and other content, a revised House bill would require proof of intent to facilitate prostitution, helping to address Internet industry concerns regarding the legislative initiative.

YouTube is making a concerted effort to remove disturbing videos featuring children in distress.

Concerned about the effect fake news could have on the democratic process, lawmakers in Ireland proposed a law that would make disseminating fake news on social media a crime.

A proposed cybersecurity law in Vietnam would require foreign tech companies like Google to establish offices and store data in that country. According to this op-ed, such a relatively late attempt to rein in Vietnam’s social media use would “most certainly trigger a popular backlash” and “seem like a retrograde move.”

A new report from clinical experts in the UK recommends that children younger than five-years-old should never be permitted to use digital technology without supervision.

Snapchat is rolling out a redesign that places all the messages and Stories from a user’s friends to the left side of the camera, and stories from professional social media stars and media outlets that the user follows to the right of it. But will people over the age of 30 still have no idea how to use the platform?

Instagram is testing a direct messaging app that would replace its current inbox. Called Direct, the app stands independent of that Instagram platform and, like Snapchat, opens to the user’s camera.

Artificial intelligence is allowing people to actually enjoy the moments they photograph by significantly cutting down the time it takes to share and catalog pictures.

There’s a browser extension that will hide all the potentially upsetting stories in your social media newsfeeds, but it’s not perfect. And maybe that’s a good thing.

Hmmm—in a tumultuous year, the ten most-liked posts on Instagram of 2017 all belong to Beyoncé, Cristiano Ronaldo or Selena Gomez.

In contrast, the most popular tweets of this year concern politics, tragedy and, well, chicken nuggets.

“Yellow journalism” websites are using social media to capitalize on popular ideology. And they’re making a bundle.

New York City recently passed the country’s first law protecting the wages of “gig economy” workers. The Wall Street Journal published an illuminating infographic illustrating who’s making a living that way.

Twitter suspended high-profile accounts associated with the “alt-right” movement.

A state law kept 43,000 wannabe Uber users in upstate New York from ordering a car from the ride-hailing service on Thanksgiving eve.

PayPal reported some surprising statistics about this year’s online shopping over Thanksgiving weekend. Check out our own blog post from last year on how social commerce is killing off both Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

Two new ethics opinions from the D.C. Bar provide an excellent overview of potential ethical issues raised by social media use by attorneys; among other things, the opinions highlight the need for lawyers to exercise caution when tweeting or posting positions on legal issues (which could potentially create an inadvertent conflict with a client’s interest), and in allowing social media platforms to access their email contacts (which could potentially identify clients or divulge information for which there is an ethical obligation to protect from disclosure). The opinions can be reviewed here and here.

Apparently vlogging can be a grind even for the most financially successful social media stars.

This New York Times piece exploring how Snapchat revolutionized social media discusses some of the unique platform and business model features that we cited last year as responsible for Snapchat’s success.

CNN bought a social media company founded by a YouTube star with a millennial following.

Speaking of CNN, that company and other prominent news publishers are getting low app store ratings from people claiming that such publishers have a liberal bias.

Google Maps just made it easier to snag a table at usually-crowded restaurants and watering holes.

Think twice before giving out your cellphone number.

Twitter took steps to remedy its harassment problem.

In addition, over the last six months, Twitter suspended 235,000 accounts that promoted terrorism.

The Washington Post is using language-generation technology to automatically produce stories on the Olympics and the election.

Video ads are going to start popping up on Pinterest.

Does it make sense for big brands to invest in expensive, highly-targeted social media advertising? Procter & Gamble doesn’t think so.

These brands are using Facebook in particularly effective ways during the Olympic games.

Since we first reported on the phenomenon nearly two years ago, Facebook has become an increasingly common vehicle for serving divorce papers.

Across the country, states are grappling with the conflict between existing laws that prohibit disclosing ballot information or images and the growing phenomenon of “ballot selfies”—photos posted to social media of people at the polls casting their ballots or of the ballots themselves.

Creating dozens of Facebook pages for a single brand can help marketers to increase social-media-engagement and please the Facebook algorithm gods, according to Contenly.

Here’s how Snapchat makes money from disappearing videos.

A Harvard Business Review article advises marketers to start listening to (as opposed to managing) conversations about their brands on social media.

For intel on what it can do to keep teens’ attention, Instagram goes straight to the source.

Instagram now allows celebrities to block trolls.

While Facebook reached new highs last quarter, Twitter continued to stumble. Will adding more live video content or allowing users to create Snapchat-like collage custom emojis over photos help Twitter regain its footing?

Tips for fixing your company’s social media marketing strategy.

A pop singer told fans to send him their Twitter passwords so he could post personal messages to their feeds. Marketing genius or potential Consumer Fraud and Abuse Act violation?

Tiffany & Co. launched a Snapchat filter to attract millennials.

Yelp posted a warning on the Yelp.com page of a Manhattan dentist who filed defamation suits against five patients over four years for giving him negative reviews.

Sponsored content is becoming king in a Facebook world.

The New York Times built an in-house analytics dashboard to make it easy for its reporters to access reader engagement data.

Pinterest appears to be losing to Snapchat in the battle for digital ad dollars.

Profile pranks or endorsement bombing on LinkedIn is an actual thing.

Facebook Messenger joins the elite “one billion monthly users” club just four years after its release as a standalone app.

A Canadian judge ordered a couple convicted of child neglect to post to all their social media accounts his decision describing their crime.

Leslie Jones of Ghostbusters highlights Twitter’s trolling problem. One tech columnist says the platform needs to rethink its application programming interface strategy to enable users and communities to insulate themselves from abuse.

Don’t drive and Facebook Live.

Google erased Dennis Cooper’s 14-year-old blog without warning or explanation. We recently examined the outcome of lawsuits challenging a platform’s right to remove user content (spoiler alert: the platforms usually win).

Twitter now lets anyone apply to get verified.

Researchers say there’s a correlation between an increase in the psychological stress that teens suffer and the amount of time they’re spending on social media.

A Playboy model who “fat-shamed” a woman by photographing her and posting it to Snapchat risks prosecution.

Forensic psychologists explain why people post evidence of their crimes to social media.

We may soon have a federal law making revenge porn illegal. Our blog post from 2014 took a look at some of the legal issues raised by revenge porn.

There’s now a dating app that sets people up on Pokémon Go dates. Want to know more about the most popular mobile game of all time? Read our Pokémon Go Business and Legal Primer.

Snapchat has caught on with “oldies” (that’s people 35 and older, FYI).

Facebook Messenger is testing “Secret” mode, a feature that allows some messages to be read only by the recipient.

A South Korean copy of Snapchat has taken off in Asia.

Using social media to help promote your brand? Here’s a list of top Facebook marketers and some advice on how to get your customers to make social platforms their point of purchase.

Meet MikMak, the mobile shopping network that sells via video.

A 14-year-old and his mother are suing Snapchat, claiming the app regularly exposes him to sexually explicit content.

Dieters are flocking to Instagram.

Twitter is looking to ink more NFL-style streaming deals.

Young performers are trying to achieve stardom by broadcasting on apps, such as YouNow. Perhaps they should go old school, and follow this advice on building the perfect YouTube channel.

The Wall Street Journal profiles Instagram’s founder, Kevin Systrom.

China is reportedly launching a crackdown on “fake news” spread on social media sites.

Snapchat’s new feature, “Memories,” will allow users to retain some content.

Social media has upended a number of industries. Is Wall Street next?

Facebook is getting into the video game live-streaming business.

Steven Avery’s defense attorney is keeping her 163,000 Twitter followers abreast of her ongoing defense work on behalf of the “Making a Murderer” documentary subject, and some lawyers think it’s a bad idea.

Five quick and easy ways to double your social media following.

Fake Internet traffic schemes will become the second-largest market for criminal organizations behind cocaine and opiate trafficking.

Bots and fraudsters are feasting on political ad dollars.

People are spending less time on social media apps these days? With Snapchat on pace to have more than 58 million active users this year, we’re skeptical.

The man who created the Internet wants to create a less centralized web with more privacy and less government and corporate control.

Should Twitter limit the number of tweets users can send each day? Other platforms see the value in limiting posts.

In the UK the number of arrests over offensive social media posts is soaring.

Research shows an alarming number of people in the UK can’t distinguish between marketing and non-commercial content on social media, indicating potential breaches of the CAP Code (the UK’s version of the FTC’s Endorsement Guides). Here’s how social media marketers in the UK can stay on the right side of the law.

Google co-founder Larry Page is secretly building flying cars.

Our attention spans are decreasing. Here’s how that should affect your brand’s website and social media strategy.

In a massive recent theft of Twitter usernames and passwords, “123456” was the most commonly used passcode by far. Sigh.

 

In a fascinating, must-read article, a Google design ethicist explains the techniques that engineers and entrepreneurs employ to keep us hooked on the web.

A majority of U.S. adults—62%—now get their news on social media.

An apartment complex in Utah is trying to force its residents to “friend” the complex.

Will the next head of state take over the vast online infrastructure that the Obama administration created as the first administration to digitally engage with its constituency?

Get ready for 74 new emojis.

Tired of being reminded about potentially painful past social media posts? Here’s how to turn off Facebook’s “On This Day” notifications.

Texas inmates are now barred from using social media.

Participating in online social networks in Russia has become risky business.

To comply with a new code of conduct in the European Union, the biggest social media platforms have agreed to remove hate speech within 24 hours.

Are websites a dying business?

Instagram’s mobile app has a new dashboard that allows small businesses to measure the reach of their posts.

Periscope users can now moderate comments during their broadcasts.

Stop telling people there’s a dot in your Gmail address—it doesn’t matter.

Hootsuite CEO Ryan Holmes says it’s important to hop on the Snapchat bandwagon, no matter how old you are. Here’s why.