In early March 2019, the Department of Justice (DOJ) revised its Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) Corporate Enforcement Policy (the Policy). First announced in November 2017, the Policy is designed to encourage companies to self-report FCPA violations and to cooperate with the DOJ’s FCPA investigations. The Policy and its recent revisions were incorporated into the United States Attorneys’ Manual (USAM), now referred to as the Justice Manual (JM), which is the internal DOJ document that sets forth policies and guidance for federal prosecutors.

One of the most notable aspects of the original Policy was its requirement that companies seeking to obtain remediation credit prohibit employees from using ephemeral messaging systems unless appropriate retention mechanisms were put in place. According to the original Policy, a company would receive full credit for remediation only “if [it] prohibit[ed] employees from using software that generates but does not appropriately retain business records or communications.”
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An advertising executive who lost his job after being named on an anonymous Instagram account is suing the now-defunct account for defamation. The suit names as defendants not only the account—Diet Madison Avenue, which was intended to root out harassment and discrimination at ad agencies—but also (as “Jane Doe 1,” “Jane Doe 2,” et cetera)

In order to comply with a new German law requiring social media sites to take down hate speech, Twitter and Facebook removed anti-Islamic social media posts authored by a German far-right political party.

The Obama administration’s screening of social media accounts of aspiring immigrants from majority-Muslim nations yielded little actionable intelligence, but the Trump

In an effort to deter hate groups from tweeting sanitized versions of their messages, Twitter has began considering account holders’ off platform behavior when the platform evaluates whether potentially harmful tweets should be removed and account holders should be suspended or permanently banned.

In connection with Congressional efforts to deter online sex trafficking by narrowing

“Yellow journalism” websites are using social media to capitalize on popular ideology. And they’re making a bundle.

New York City recently passed the country’s first law protecting the wages of “gig economy” workers. The Wall Street Journal published an illuminating infographic illustrating who’s making a living that way.

Twitter suspended high-profile accounts associated

Twitter took steps to remedy its harassment problem.

In addition, over the last six months, Twitter suspended 235,000 accounts that promoted terrorism.

The Washington Post is using language-generation technology to automatically produce stories on the Olympics and the election.

Video ads are going to start popping up on Pinterest.

Does it make sense for big

Instagram now allows celebrities to block trolls.

While Facebook reached new highs last quarter, Twitter continued to stumble. Will adding more live video content or allowing users to create Snapchat-like collage custom emojis over photos help Twitter regain its footing?

Tips for fixing your company’s social media marketing strategy.

A pop singer

Facebook Messenger joins the elite “one billion monthly users” club just four years after its release as a standalone app.

A Canadian judge ordered a couple convicted of child neglect to post to all their social media accounts his decision describing their crime.

Leslie Jones of Ghostbusters highlights Twitter’s trolling problem. One tech columnist

Snapchat has caught on with “oldies” (that’s people 35 and older, FYI).

Facebook Messenger is testing “Secret” mode, a feature that allows some messages to be read only by the recipient.

A South Korean copy of Snapchat has taken off in Asia.

Using social media to help promote your brand? Here’s a list of

Social media has upended a number of industries. Is Wall Street next?

Facebook is getting into the video game live-streaming business.

Steven Avery’s defense attorney is keeping her 163,000 Twitter followers abreast of her ongoing defense work on behalf of the “Making a Murderer” documentary subject, and some lawyers think it’s a bad idea.