Finding that President Trump’s Twitter feed constitutes a public forum, a federal judge in New York City held that it’s a First Amendment violation when the President or one of his assistants blocks a Twitter user from viewing or responding to one of the President’s tweets. As the New York Times points out, the decision “is likely to have implications far beyond Mr. Trump’s feed and its 52 million followers.” A blog post on the online version of the monthly magazine Reason provides some tips for politicians with social media accounts who want to stay on the right side of the law.

Speaking of President Trump, the former secretary of a federal judge is claiming the President got her fired. Okay, not exactly. The secretary, Olga Zuniga, who worked for a judge on Texas’s highest criminal court, filed a lawsuit alleging that the judge—a member of the GOP—terminated her employment because he found Facebook posts in which Zuniga criticized President Trump’s and other Republican politicians’ immigration policies. A post on Popehat, a fellow ABA Web 100 honoree, explores the strength of Zuniga’s case.

Unless you’ve been living in a cave, you know that the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) took effect last Friday, May 25th. Now that the dust has cleared, if you are interested in up-to-date information regarding GDPR developments and compliance insights, check out our GDPR Readiness Center. If you want details on what GDPR means for your outsourcing and other vendor agreements, you might want to attend our upcoming webinar.

The impact of GDPR is being felt across social media platforms in all sorts of ways. For example, in a move reportedly prompted by GDPR, Twitter has shut down accounts of those users who, at the time that they joined Twitter, were under 13 years of age, based on date-of-birth information voluntarily provided by such users during the registration process.

Facing an inbox full of companies’ privacy policy updates? You can blame that on the GDPR too. In fact, the onslaught of GDPR-induced privacy-policy updates inspired some pretty creative memes on Twitter.

Wait… the GDPR will also affect tourists taking photos with their phones?

Instagram is expanding its anti-bullying initiatives by using a machine-learning algorithm to filter out harassing comments and reviewing the accounts with an especially high number of blocked comments to determine whether the owners of those accounts have violated the platform’s community guidelines.

The still-unprofitable Snapchat will begin running six-second advertisements that its users will not be able to skip. These un-skippable commercials will not run during users’ personal stories, only during select Snapchat Shows—highly produced three-to-five minute programs from well-known entertainment companies.

The fascinating story of how Wired lost a small fortune in Bitcoin. . . . (Well, the Bitcoins are here, but the key has been destroyed.)

The Royal Wedding was a bigger topic on Pinterest than it was on Facebook. FastCompany speculates that it’s because Pinterest’s audience is predominantly women and reveals the subject of most of the Royal Wedding pins.

Based on copyright infringement, emotional distress and other claims, a federal district court in California awarded $6.4 million to a victim of revenge porn, the posting of explicit material without the subject’s consent. The judgment is believed to be one of the largest awards relating to revenge porn. A Socially Aware post that we wrote back in 2014 explains the difficulties of using causes of action like copyright infringement—and state laws—as vehicles for fighting revenge porn.

The highest court in New York State held that whether or not a personal injury plaintiff’s Facebook photos are discoverable does not depend on whether the photos were set to “private,” but rather “the nature of the event giving rise to the litigation and the injuries claimed, as well as any other information specific to the case.”

A federal district court held that Kentucky’s governor did not violate the free speech rights of two Kentucky citizens when he blocked them from commenting on his Facebook page and Twitter account. The opinion underscores differences among courts as to the First Amendment’s application to government officials’ social media accounts; for example, a Virginia federal district court’s 2017 holding reached the opposite conclusion in a case involving similar facts.

Having witnessed social media’s potential to escalate gang disputes, judges in Illinois have imposed limitations on some juvenile defendants’ use of the popular platforms, a move that some defense attorneys argue violates the young defendants’ First Amendment rights.

A bill proposed by California State Sen. Bob Hertzberg would require social media platforms to identify bots—automated accounts that appear to be owned by real people but are actually computer programs capable of simulating human dialog. Bots can spread a message across social media faster and more widely than would be humanly possible, and have been used in efforts to manipulate public opinion.

This CIO article lists the new strategies, job titles and processes that will be popular this year among businesses transforming into data-driven enterprises.

A solo law practitioner in Chicago filed a complaint claiming defamation and false light against a former client who she alleges posted a Yelp review calling her a “con artist” and a “legal predator”  after, allegedly pursuant to the terms of his retainer, she billed $9,000 to his credit card for a significant amount of legal work.

Carnival Cruise Line put up signs all over the hometown of the 15-year-old owner of the Snapchat handle @CarnivalCruise in order to locate him and offer him and his family a luxurious free vacation in exchange for the transfer of his Snapchat handle—and the unusual but innovate strategy paid off. Who knew that old-school billboards could be so effectively used for one-on-one marketing?

In a decision that has generated considerable controversy, a federal court in New York has held that the popular practice of embedding tweets into websites and blogs can result in copyright infringement. Plaintiff Justin Goldman had taken a photo of NFL quarterback Tom Brady, which Goldman posted to Snapchat. Snapchat users “screengrabbed” the image for use in tweets on Twitter. The defendants—nine news outlets—embedded tweets featuring the Goldman photo into online articles so that the photo itself was never hosted on the news outlets’ servers; rather, it was hosted on Twitter’s servers (a process known as “framing” or “inline linking”). The court found that, even absent any copying of the image onto their own servers, the news outlets’ actions had resulted in a violation of Goldman’s exclusive right to authorize the public display of his photo.

If legislation recently introduced in California passes, businesses with apps or websites requiring passwords and enabling Golden State residents younger than 18 to share content could be prohibited from asking those minors to agree to the site’s or the app’s terms and conditions of use.

After a lawyer was unable to serve process by delivering court documents to a defendant’s physical and email addresses, the Ontario Superior Court granted the lawyer permission to serve process by mailing a statement of claim to the defendant’s last known address and by sending the statement of claim through private messages to the defendant’s Instagram and LinkedIn accounts. This is reportedly the first time an Ontario court has permitted service of process through social media. The first instance that we at Socially Aware heard of a U.S. court permitting a plaintiff to serve process on a domestic, U.S.-based defendant through a social media account happened back in 2014.

Videos that impose celebrities’ and non-famous people’s faces onto porn performers’ to produce believable videos have surfaced on the Internet, and are on the verge of proliferating. Unlike the non-consensual dissemination of explicit photos that haven’t been manipulated—sometimes referred to as “revenge porn”—this fake porn is technically not a privacy issue, and making it illegal could raise First Amendment issues.

By mining datasets and social media to recover millions of dollars lost to tax fraud and errors, the IRS may be violating common law and the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, according to an op-ed piece in The Hill.

A woman is suing her ex-husband, a sheriff’s deputy in Georgia, for having her and her friend arrested and briefly jailed for posting on Facebook about his alleged refusal to drop off medication for his sick children on his way to work. The women had been charged with “criminal defamation of character” but the case was ultimately dropped after a state court judge ruled there was no basis for the arrest.

During a hearing in a Manhattan federal court over a suit brought by seven Twitter users who say President Trump blocked them on Twitter for having responded to his tweets, the plaintiffs’ lawyer compared Twitter to a “virtual town hall” where “blocking is a state action and violates the First Amendment.” An assistant district attorney, on the other hand, analogized the social media platform to a convention where the presiding official can decide whether or not to engage with someone. The district court judge who heard the arguments refused to decide the case on the spot and encouraged the parties to settle out of court.

Have your social media connections been posting headshots of themselves alongside historical portraits of people who look just like them? Those posts are the product of a Google app that matches the photo of a person’s face to a famous work of art, and the results can be fun. But not for people who live in Illinois or Texas, where access to the app isn’t available. Experts believe it’s because laws in those states restrict how companies can use biometric data.

The stock market is apparently keeping up with the Kardashians. A day after Kim Kardashian’s half-sister Kylie Jenner tweeted her frustration with Snapchat’s recent redesign, the company’s market value decreased by $1.3 billion.

In an effort to deter hate groups from tweeting sanitized versions of their messages, Twitter has began considering account holders’ off platform behavior when the platform evaluates whether potentially harmful tweets should be removed and account holders should be suspended or permanently banned.

In connection with Congressional efforts to deter online sex trafficking by narrowing the Communications Decency Act’s Section 230 safe harbor protection for website operators from claims arising from third-party ads and other content, a revised House bill would require proof of intent to facilitate prostitution, helping to address Internet industry concerns regarding the legislative initiative.

YouTube is making a concerted effort to remove disturbing videos featuring children in distress.

Concerned about the effect fake news could have on the democratic process, lawmakers in Ireland proposed a law that would make disseminating fake news on social media a crime.

A proposed cybersecurity law in Vietnam would require foreign tech companies like Google to establish offices and store data in that country. According to this op-ed, such a relatively late attempt to rein in Vietnam’s social media use would “most certainly trigger a popular backlash” and “seem like a retrograde move.”

A new report from clinical experts in the UK recommends that children younger than five-years-old should never be permitted to use digital technology without supervision.

Snapchat is rolling out a redesign that places all the messages and Stories from a user’s friends to the left side of the camera, and stories from professional social media stars and media outlets that the user follows to the right of it. But will people over the age of 30 still have no idea how to use the platform?

Instagram is testing a direct messaging app that would replace its current inbox. Called Direct, the app stands independent of that Instagram platform and, like Snapchat, opens to the user’s camera.

Artificial intelligence is allowing people to actually enjoy the moments they photograph by significantly cutting down the time it takes to share and catalog pictures.

There’s a browser extension that will hide all the potentially upsetting stories in your social media newsfeeds, but it’s not perfect. And maybe that’s a good thing.

Hmmm—in a tumultuous year, the ten most-liked posts on Instagram of 2017 all belong to Beyoncé, Cristiano Ronaldo or Selena Gomez.

In contrast, the most popular tweets of this year concern politics, tragedy and, well, chicken nuggets.

In an opinion granting a preliminary injunction preventing LinkedIn from blocking a startup’s use of information in LinkedIn profiles accessible to the entire public, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California expressed doubts that a federal anti-hacking law—the Computer Fraud & Abuse Act—prohibits the startup’s scraping of such publicly available information from a website, even if the website owner has asked for the scraping to stop.

Former U.S. president Obama’s tweet quoting Nelson Mandela in the wake of the violent Charlottesville rally is now the most “liked” tweet in history, surpassing Ariana Grande’s response to the Manchester terrorist attack in May.

Does the First Amendment prohibit politicians from blocking people with opposing views on Twitter, Facebook and other social media platforms? A new wave of lawsuits are teeing up this issue for the courts to resolve.

In a rape case involving two former college football players, the Tennessee Supreme Court held the state’s law on defense subpoenas entitles the defendants to receive access to their alleged victims’ relevant social media and text messaging histories.

Google researchers discovered an algorithm capable of removing the watermarks that stock-imagery sites use in an effort to protect copyrighted content—and suggest a way to thwart the algorithm’s use.

With 2-to-3-minute long episodes, Snapchat’s first daily news program, NBC News’s “Stay Tuned,” has more than 29 million unique viewers.

Speaking of Snapchat, the innovative social media platform just introduced a feature called Crowd Surf that allows users to watch an event like a concert by connecting snaps together based on their audio.

Instagram will soon begin organizing comments into threads the way Facebook does.

A former partner at an Illinois law firm is the subject of a complaint filed by the state’s attorney disciplinary committee for setting up a phony profile on Match.com for a female attorney who practices in his town.

A Georgia judge was suspended for his social media posts, which, among other things, called supporters of de-Confederatization efforts “the nut cases tearing down monuments” and compared them to the radical Islamic terrorist group ISIS.

By deploying the first autonomous impact protection vehicle—a truck designed to absorb the impact of an errant car—the Colorado Department of Transportation eliminated the need for a human driver to risk taking one of the most dangerous jobs around.

Social media has had a huge impact on flight attendants’ work lives.

A defamation suit brought by one reality television star against another—and naming Discovery Communications as a defendant—could determine to what extent (if any) media companies may be held responsible for what their talent posts on social media.

In a move characterized as setting legal precedent, UK lawyers served an injunction against “persons unknown” via an email account linked to someone who was posting allegedly defamatory “fake news” stories on social media.

European regulators fined Google $2.7 billion for violating antitrust law by allegedly tailoring algorithms for product-related queries to promote its own comparison shopping service. If the search company doesn’t change how its search engine works in the EU in the next few months, it risks fines of up to 5% of its parent company Alphabet Inc.’s daily revenue.

A newly formed trade group, called the Influencer Marketing Council, is representing social influencers in discussions with regulators and Internet platforms, and is leading an effort to outline best practices for complying with the FTC’s endorsement guidelines.

Pinterest’s commercial progress has reportedly been hampered by several factors, including the format of its advertisements, which must mimic user posts—something that requires brands to design content specifically for the platform.

Members of law enforcement have expressed concerns regarding the safety risks posed by a Snapchat update that lets users see the exact location of their Snapchat “friends.” An article on The Verge has some useful tips on how to use the function, which is called Snap Map, and how to turn it off.

Because the First Amendment limits the ability of the U.S. government to regulate search companies’ and social media platforms’ policies and guidelines, companies like Google and Twitter might eventually be de facto regulated even within the United States by foreign nations whose governments are entitled to regulate what happens on the Internet in order to protect their citizens according to their own laws.

Several A-list musicians have stepped away from social media at least partly because their incredible popularity has made them an attractive target for trolls.

Here are tips on how to limit online service providers from collecting information about you in using social media and surfing the web.

The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously held that a North Carolina law that the state has used to prosecute more than 1,000 sex offenders for posting on social media is unconstitutional because it violates the First Amendment.

The U.S. Supreme Court denied certiorari in what has become known as the  “dancing baby” case—a lawsuit brought by a woman who sued Universal Music Group for directing YouTube to take down a video of her toddler-age son dancing to Prince’s “Let’s Go Crazy.” The high court’s decision leaves in place the decision of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals holding that copyright owners must consider the possibility of fair use before sending a DMCA takedown notice.

Queen Elizabeth II proposed to Parliament a law that would require social networking sites to honor Internet users’ requests to remove anything the users shared before turning 18. The European Union already requires search engines to abide by users’ requests to remove information as part of the “right to be forgotten,” but the information must fulfill several criteria to qualify for removal.

In an effort to minimize the extent to which social bots can manipulate public opinion, Germany plans to update its communication laws to require the operators of social media platforms to identify when posts were generated by social bots and not actual people. And, yes, the name in German for this labeling requirement is Kennzeichnungspflicht.

In other German social-media-news, police in that country raided the homes of 36 people accused of posting on social media hate speech that included threats and harassment based on race and sexual orientation, and left-wing and right-wing extremist content.

Making Texas one of 18 states to pass a bill on self-driving cars, Lone Star State governor Greg Abbott signed a bill confirming that car manufacturers may test autonomous vehicles on Texas roads and highways.

Bitcoin’s price might be surging, but it has yet to achieve widespread usage.

Motivated in part by her desire to avoid real-estate-agent fees, a London homeowner plans to sell her house by hosting a viewing on Facebook Live and receiving offers through Facebook Messenger.

One year since agreeing with the European Commission to remove hate speech within 24 hours of receiving a complaint about it, Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter and YouTube are removing flagged content an average of 59% of the time, the EC reports.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit held that a catering company violated the National Labor Relations Act when it fired an employee for posting to Facebook a profane rant about his supervisor in response to that supervisor admonishing him for “chitchatting” days before the employee and his coworkers were holding a vote to unionize.

The value of the digital currency Ether could surpass Bitcoin’s value by 2018, some experts say.

The Washington Post takes a look at how the NBA is doing a particularly good job of leveraging social media and technology in general to market itself to younger fans and international consumers.

A judge in Israel ruled in favor of a landlord who took down a rental ad based on his belief that a couple wanted to rent his apartment after they sent him a text message containing festive emoji and otherwise expressing interest in the rental. The landlord brought a lawsuit against the couple for backing out on the deal, and the court held the emoji in the couple’s text “convey[ed] great optimism.” The court further determined that, although the message “did not constitute a binding contract between the parties, [it] naturally led to the Plaintiff’s great reliance on the defendants’ desire to rent his apartment.” For a survey of U.S. courts’ treatment of emoji entered into evidence, read this post on Socially Aware.

The owner of a recipe site is suing the Food Network for copyright infringement, alleging that a video the network posted on its Facebook page ripped off her how-to video for snow globe cupcakes.

Twitter’s popularity with journalists has made it a prime target for media manipulators, The New York Times’s Farhad Manjoo reports. As a result, Manjoo claims, the microblogging platform played a key role in many of the past year’s biggest misinformation campaigns.

The Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University claims that the @realDonaldTrump Twitter account’s blocking of some Twitter users violates the First Amendment because it suppresses speech in a public forum protected by the Constitution.

Pop singer Taylor Swift, who pulled her back catalogue of music from free streaming services in 2014 saying the services don’t fairly compensate music creators, has now made her entire catalogue of music accessible via Spotify, Google Play and Amazon Music.

To encourage young people in swing constituencies to vote for Labour in the UK’s general election, some Tinder users turned their profiles over to a bot that sent other Tinder users between the ages of 18 and 25 automated messages asking if they were voting and focusing on key topics that would interest young voters.

Twitter is suing the Department of Homeland Security in an attempt to void a summons demanding records that would identify the creator of an anti-Trump Twitter account.

Facebook has joined the fight against the nonconsensual dissemination of sexually explicit photos online—content known as “revenge porn”—by having specially trained employees review images flagged by users and using photo-matching technologies to help stop revenge porn images from being shared on the company’s apps and platforms.

Amid its own revenge porn scandal, the U.S. Marines Corps has expanded its social media policy to clarify how military code can be used to prosecute members’ offensive or disrespectful online activities.

A Minnesota judge has ordered Google to disclose all searches for the name of the victim of a wire-fraud crime worth less than $30,000.

Scientists are studying the use of emoji in human interactions, marketing campaigns and business transactions. Here at Socially Aware we’ve taken a look at the difficulty that courts have had in evaluating the meaning of emoji in connection with contract, tort and other legal claims.

Did the White House’s social media director violate the Hatch Act with a tweet?

In the interest of maintaining big-spending advertisers’ business, Google is trying to teach computers the nuances of what makes content objectionable.

The upcoming desktop version of the popular mobile dating app Tinder, Tinder Online, prompts users to talk more and swipe less.

One jet-setting couple with a combined three million Instagram followers is earning between $3,000 and $9,000 per post.

The New York Times’s Brian Chen walks readers through some of the most worthwhile apps and tech gadgets in the pet-care category.

Google unveiled a new tool designed to combat toxic speech online by assessing the language commenters use, as opposed to the ideas they express.

Is a state law banning sex offenders from social media unconstitutional? Based on their comments during oral arguments in Packingham v. North Carolina, some U.S. Supreme Court justices may think so.

Facebook is implementing a feature that uses artificial intelligence to identify posts reflecting suicidal inclinations.

Facebook Analytics for Apps reached a significant milestone: It now supports more than 1 million apps.

So did YouTube, which recently surpassed 1 billion hours of video per day.

As many as 15% of regular social media usersthat is, people, not businesses—are buying “likes” on social media?!

The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct’s warning to judges about their use of social media was prompted by this case in which a St. Lawrence County town judge used Facebook to criticize the prosecution of a town council candidate.

More than 40% of Americans incessantly check their gadgets for new messages and social media status updates, and it might be making them a little crazy.

University of Manchester researchers have developed a computer that is faster than any other because its processors are made of DNA, which allows the computer to replicate itself.

Mobile marketers can significantly increase the open rates of their push notifications by doing one simple thing: including emojis.

A woman whose “starter marriage” was covered by the New York Times wedding announcements section in 1989 might have been spared some angst if the United States had a Right to Be Forgotten, as Europe does.