Twitter is suing the Department of Homeland Security in an attempt to void a summons demanding records that would identify the creator of an anti-Trump Twitter account.

Facebook has joined the fight against the nonconsensual dissemination of sexually explicit photos online—content known as “revenge porn”—by having specially trained employees review images flagged by users and

Google unveiled a new tool designed to combat toxic speech online by assessing the language commenters use, as opposed to the ideas they express.

Is a state law banning sex offenders from social media unconstitutional? Based on their comments during oral arguments in Packingham v. North Carolina, some U.S. Supreme Court justices may think

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) has filed suit to overturn a law that requires the popular entertainment website to remove the ages or birth dates of people in the entertainment industry upon request.

Vine might not be history after all.

Twitter users posted more than one billion election-related tweets between the first presidential debate and

Instagram now allows users to hide offensive comments posted to their feeds. Take that trolls!

Soon you’ll be able to watch Twitter content like NFL Thursday Night Football on a Twitter app on Apple TV, Xbox One and Amazon Fire TV.

“Ballot selfie” laws—laws that prohibit posting online photos of completed election ballots—are being

Instagram now allows users to zoom in on photos in their feeds and at least 11 brands are already capitalizing on the new feature.

Pinterest acquired Instapaper, a tool that allows you to cache webpages for reading at a later time.

A social-media celebrity with 500,000 followers and a lot of people interacting with

Twitter took steps to remedy its harassment problem.

In addition, over the last six months, Twitter suspended 235,000 accounts that promoted terrorism.

The Washington Post is using language-generation technology to automatically produce stories on the Olympics and the election.

Video ads are going to start popping up on Pinterest.

Does it make sense for big

Facebook Messenger joins the elite “one billion monthly users” club just four years after its release as a standalone app.

A Canadian judge ordered a couple convicted of child neglect to post to all their social media accounts his decision describing their crime.

Leslie Jones of Ghostbusters highlights Twitter’s trolling problem. One tech columnist

Earlier this year, I helped moderate a lively panel discussion on social media business and legal trends. The panelists, who represented well-known brands, didn’t agree on anything. One panelist would make an observation, only to be immediately challenged by another panelist. Hoping to generate even more sparks, I asked each panelist to identify the issue

The Great Instagram Logo Freakout of 2016.

A UK council policy reportedly grants its members power to spy on residents by setting up fake Facebook profiles.

Guess who spends more of their workday on social media, women or men?

Lessons from one of YouTube’s first (and most successful) stars.

Should sharing tragic images

We’re trying something new here at Socially Aware: In addition to our usual social-media and tech-law analyses and updates, we’re going to end each work week with a list of links to interesting social media stories around the Web, primarily things that caught our eye during the week that we may or may not