A nice overview of the rules on researching jurors’ social media accounts in various jurisdictions from Law.com.

The importance of appearing at the top of Google search results, especially on mobile devices, is driving retailers to spend more and more on the search engine’s product listing ads, which include not just text but

Instagram now allows users to hide offensive comments posted to their feeds. Take that trolls!

Soon you’ll be able to watch Twitter content like NFL Thursday Night Football on a Twitter app on Apple TV, Xbox One and Amazon Fire TV.

“Ballot selfie” laws—laws that prohibit posting online photos of completed election ballots—are being

Facebook Messenger joins the elite “one billion monthly users” club just four years after its release as a standalone app.

A Canadian judge ordered a couple convicted of child neglect to post to all their social media accounts his decision describing their crime.

Leslie Jones of Ghostbusters highlights Twitter’s trolling problem. One tech columnist

The UK wants to use the blockchain to track the spending of welfare recipients.

Some believe that a recent Ninth Circuit holding could turn sharing passwords into a federal crime under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

And another Ninth Circuit opinion sided with Facebook in a closely-watched case interpreting the same federal law, this

Snapchat has caught on with “oldies” (that’s people 35 and older, FYI).

Facebook Messenger is testing “Secret” mode, a feature that allows some messages to be read only by the recipient.

A South Korean copy of Snapchat has taken off in Asia.

Using social media to help promote your brand? Here’s a list of

Facebook signs more than $50 million worth of deals with media firms and celebrities to create videos for its live-streaming service.

Tumblr is jumping on the live video bandwagon, too—but via live-streaming platform partners, not through its own service.

C-Span picked up live feeds of the Democratic sit-in over gun-control legislation that representatives shot on

Here’s how Twitter is loosening up its 140-character limit.

The federal government will now check the social media history of prospective employees before granting them security clearance.

One expert says C-level executives shouldn’t entrust millennials with their companies’ social media feeds.

Federal court refuses to dismiss a lawsuit against Google for allegedly removing sites

The Great Instagram Logo Freakout of 2016.

A UK council policy reportedly grants its members power to spy on residents by setting up fake Facebook profiles.

Guess who spends more of their workday on social media, women or men?

Lessons from one of YouTube’s first (and most successful) stars.

Should sharing tragic images

January is the month when lists—lists of predictions, lists of trends, lists of feats and lists of failures—pervade social media newsfeeds and publications’ headlines. Here at Socially Aware we’re making an annual tradition of curating a “List of Lists”—an inventory of the roundups that we think will be of most interest to our readership.

We’ll 

150728SociallyAware_Page_01The latest issue of our Socially Aware newsletter is now available here.

In this issue of Socially Aware, our Burton Award-winning guide to the law and business of social media, we present a “grand unifying theory” of today’s leading technologies and the legal challenges these technologies raise; we discuss whether hashtags can