Online service providers typically seek to mitigate risk by including arbitration clauses in their user agreements. In order for such agreements to be effective, however, they must be implemented properly. Babcock vs. Neutron Holdings, Inc., a recent Southern District of Florida case involving a plaintiff who was injured while riding one of the defendant’s Lime e-scooters, illustrates that courts will closely scrutinize the details of how an online contract is presented to users to determine whether or not it is enforceable.
Continue Reading Sweating the Details: Court Analyzes User Interface to Uphold Online Arbitration Clause

As we have noted many times in prior articles, courts often refuse to enforce “browsewrap” agreements where terms are presented to users merely by including a link on a page or screen without requiring affirmative acceptance. Courts typically look more favorably on “clickwrap” agreements where users agree to be bound by, for example, checking a box or clicking an “I accept” button.

The problem is that many implementations of online contracts do not fit neatly into one category or the other. The result is that courts, seemingly unable to resist the siren song of the “-wrap” terminology, find themselves struggling to shoehorn real-life cases into the binary clickwrap/browsewrap rubric, and often resort to inventing new terminology such as the dreaded “hybridwrap.”

HealthplanCRM, LLC v. Avmed, Inc., a case out of the Western District of Pennsylvania, illustrates this phenomenon. Plaintiff Cavulus licensed certain CRM software to defendant AvMed. AvMed decided to replace Cavulus software with a different CRM product and engaged defendant NTT to assist AvMed in transitioning its data to the successor product. Cavulus alleged, among other things, that NTT misappropriated its trade secrets in the course of doing this work. Cavulus sought to compel NTT to arbitrate these claims based on an arbitration clause contained in an “End-User Agreement” that was referenced in a link on the log-in page of the Cavulus software.
Continue Reading Court Discovers Rare and Elusive “Enforceable Browsewrap”

Courts continue to grapple with the enforceability of online agreements. While courts generally enforce clickwrap agreements—online agreements where users affirmatively show their acceptance after being presented with the terms, usually by clicking “I agree”—browsewrap agreements have stood on shakier enforceability grounds. Browsewrap agreements are online terms that, unlike a clickwrap agreement, do not require any affirmative indication of consent. Indeed, users can often continue using a website without ever viewing the terms of a browsewrap agreement, or possibly even knowing they exist. As the Northern District of California’s decision in Alejandro Gutierrez v. FriendFinder Networks Inc. demonstrates, browsewrap agreements are not always unenforceable, but reaching such a determination can be a highly fact-specific inquiry requiring significant discovery—including discovery of offline activities, such as phonecalls between the user and the online service provider.

AdultFriendFinder.com (AFF) is an online dating website. The website is generally free, although users can pay for particular upgrades and services. Users must register to use the site, and AFF collects users’ personal information as part of the registration process. Use of AFF is governed by the site’s Terms of Use (the Terms). Users don’t have to explicitly agree to the Terms in order to register or use AFF, but the Terms are readily available on the site, and they state that continued use of AFF constitutes acceptance. The Terms also include an arbitration provision.
Continue Reading Just Browsing: District Court Finds Browsewrap Agreement Enforceable

On July 19, 2018, in May, et al. v. Expedia Inc., U.S. Magistrate Judge Mark Lane issued a Report and Recommendation recommending that U.S. District Judge Robert Pitman for the Western District of Texas grant a motion to compel arbitration and dismiss a putative class action on the grounds that the plaintiff agreed to the defendants’ website’s Terms and Conditions, which contained a mandatory arbitration clause.

HomeAway User Files Putative Class Action 

HomeAway is an online marketplace for vacation rental properties where property owners can list their properties for rent and travelers can book rental properties. HomeAway’s original business model was to charge owners a fee to list their properties (either on a one-year subscription or pay-per-booking basis) and to allow travelers to search and book rentals for free. HomeAway was acquired by Expedia in 2015 and changed its business model to charge travelers a fee to book rentals in mid-2016. Plaintiff James May had been a property owner who used HomeAway since 2013.
Continue Reading Sneaky Website User Bound by Online Terms of Use’s Arbitration Provision Despite Renewing Subscription in Spouse’s Name

In a decision that has generated considerable controversy, a federal court in New York has held that the popular practice of embedding tweets into websites and blogs can result in copyright infringement. Plaintiff Justin Goldman had taken a photo of NFL quarterback Tom Brady, which Goldman posted to Snapchat. Snapchat users “screengrabbed” the image