SociallyAware_Vol8Issue1_Thumb2The latest issue of our Socially Aware newsletter is now available here.

In this edition,we examine a spate of court decisions that appear to rein in the historically broad scope of the Communications Decency Act’s Section 230 safe harbor for website operators; we outline ten steps companies can take to be better prepared for

0329_JS_imageThe European Commission has published two draft directives on the supply of digital content and the online sale of goods that aim to help harmonise consumer law across Europe. In proposing these new laws, the European Union is making progress towards one of the main goals in its Digital Single Market Strategy (announced in May 2015), which is concerned with strengthening the European digital economy and increasing consumer confidence in online trading across EU Member States. According to the Commission, only 12% of EU retailers sell online to consumers in other EU countries, while more than three times as many sell online in their own country. The Commission has also announced a plan to carry out a fitness check of other existing European consumer protection laws.

This article outlines the potential implications of these latest developments, with a particular focus on the UK and Germany.

DIGITAL CONTENT AND ONLINE SALES OF GOODS

This is not the first time that the Commission has tried to align consumer laws across the EU: the Commission’s last attempt at a Common European Sales Law faltered in 2015. But the Commission has now proposed two new directives dealing with contracts for the supply of digital content (“Draft Digital Content Directive”) and sales of online goods (“Draft Online Goods Directive”) (together, the “Proposed Directives”). The Online Goods Directive will replace certain aspects of an Existing Sales of Consumer Goods and Associated Guarantees Directive (“Existing Goods Directive”), whereas the Digital Cotent Directive introduces a new set of rights for consumers when they buy digital content across the EU.

Part of the issue with previous EU legislative initiatives in this area is that “harmonised” has really meant “the same as long as a country doesn’t want to do anything different”. This time, the Proposed Directives have been drafted as so-called “maximum harmonisation measures”, which would preclude Member States from providing any greater or lesser protection for the matters falling within their scope. The Commission hopes that this consistent approach across Member States will encourage consumers to enter into transactions across EU borders, while also allowing suppliers to simplify their legal documentation by using a single set of terms and conditions for all customers within the EU.

The Proposed Directives will need to be adopted by the EU Parliament and Council before becoming law. Member States would then have two years to transpose the Proposed Directives into national law.


Continue Reading Digital Single Market Strategy Update: Europe Proposes Further Harmonisation of Consumer Protection Laws

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The latest issue of our Socially Aware newsletter is now available here.

01_08__Jan_SociallyAware_COVER_v6In this issue of Socially Aware, our Burton Award-winning guide to the law and business of social media, we offer practical tips to help ensure the enforceability of website terms of use; we discuss the FTC’s ongoing efforts to enforce disclosure