Nearly all companies—whether they’re focused on the B2C market or the B2B market—have embraced social media as a way to promote their goods and services and to interact with customers and potential customers. The growing use of social media has, however, created challenges for federal securities regulators who must enforce antifraud rules that were written

Untitled Extract PagesThe growing use of social media has created challenges for federal securities regulators and, given the significance of social media as a preferred method of communication for a large percentage of market participants, the need to adapt Federal securities laws and the regulatory framework applicable to broker-dealers and investment advisers to social media channels has

As the use of social media continues to grow, social media is likely to play an increasingly more prominent role in proxy contests. In this context, the recent Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations issued by the SEC’s Division of Corporation Finance provide helpful clarifications on how social media outlets can be used in proxy contests in compliance with SEC regulations.

SOCIAL MEDIA’S IMPACT ON PROXY CONTESTS

Activist investors have used social media and have at times been able to “move the market” through social media statements in support of or against a public company. Carl Icahn first used Twitter to express his concerns against Dell Inc.’s buyout in 2013, referencing his interest in Dell in his first Twitter posting. Icahn also made extensive use of social media in the recent eBay, Inc proxy contest, in which Icahn pressured eBay to add two of Icahn’s nominees to eBay’s board of directors and to spin off eBay’s PayPal division. Icahn made multiple statements related to the eBay proxy contest through his personal Twitter account, including a link to an article about eBay’s corporate governance problems, links to letters on Icahn’s website supporting his position and criticizing eBay, and short jabs at eBay that could stand alone within the 140 character limitation of a Twitter post. Similarly, members of eBay’s board also used Twitter to announce their positions against Icahn in the proxy contest (In April 2014, Icahn and eBay reached an agreement that put one of Icahn’s nominees on the eBay board).

In the general effort to inform and persuade shareholders during a proxy contest, social media can be a powerful tool, and it can grab the attention of a larger audience. As Carl Icahn’s example suggests, social media can be used to make statements with a length and tone tailored to a specific social media platform, and to share links to information and analysis that provide more depth and greater disclosure to an interested reader.


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The latest issue of our Socially Aware newsletter is now available here.

In this issue of Socially Aware, our Burton Award-winning guide to the law and business of social media, we analyze a groundbreaking FTC complaint alleging deceptive practices online that could turn website Terms of Use into federal law; we summarize

The staff of the Division of Corporation Finance of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) recently provided guidance on applying its rules regarding communications in connection with securities offerings, tender offers, business combinations and proxy contests when statements are made utilizing certain social media channels. The staff’s guidance permits the use of a hyperlink to information required by certain rules when a character- or text-limited social media channel such as Twitter is used for a regulated communication, and also confirms that, at least in the context of a securities offering, a communication that has been re-transmitted by a third party that is not an offering participant or someone acting on behalf of the issuer is not attributable to the issuer for the purposes of the rules that apply to such communication.
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When the Securities and Exchange Commission lifted the ban on general solicitation and general advertising for private offerings of securities, can marketing blitzes on Twitter and other social media sites be far behind?

It is not likely that we will see hedge funds aggressively touting investments on Twitter, or on bus shelters or milk cartons

Article courtesy of Morrison & Foerster’s MoFo Tech

As financial institutions and investors turn to social media to instantly share snippets of news and potential clues about market trends, the FBI and SEC are monitoring such postings for evidence of insider trading and improper investment information. Companies must comply with pre-Internet federal securities laws covering

On April 2, 2013, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) issued guidance in the form of the Report of Investigation under Section 21(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 which indicates that social media channels—such as Twitter and Facebook—could be used by public companies to disseminate material information, without running afoul of Regulation

Following this morning’s meeting, the Commission has published its proposed rules:

http://www.sec.gov/rules/proposed/2012/33-9354.pdf

Summary

The SEC published its guidance today as a proposed rule, with a comment period, and not as an interim final rule.

The SEC proposes to amend Rule 506 to provide that the prohibition against general solicitation contained in Rule 502(c) shall not

At a meeting this morning, the SEC voted to propose rules relaxing the ban on general solicitation for certain offerings conducted pursuant to Rule 506 and resales under Rule 144A.  In a meeting that lasted approximately 45 minutes, the Staff outlined the principal aspects of the proposed rules.  The Staff indicated that it was proposing