As Socially Aware readers know, social media is transforming the way companies interact with consumers. Learn how to make the most of these online opportunities while minimizing your company’s legal risks at Practising Law Institute’s (PLI) 2018 Social Media conference, to be held in San Francisco on Thursday, February 1st, and in New York City on Wednesday, February 14th; both events will be webcasted. The conference will be chaired by Socially Aware co-editor John Delaney, and our other co-editor, Aaron Rubin, will also be presenting at the event.

Topics to be addressed will include:

  • The new business opportunities—and legal risks—that social media is providing for businesses
  • What every company should know about online contractual eco-systems
  • How to avoid running afoul of the law when employing social media influencers and using marketing tools like user-generated content, hashtags and native advertising online
  • The privacy-related developments that have arisen in connection with geo-location tracking and interest-based advertising
  • How to minimize the risks that accompany social media use in the workplace

In addition, an in-house panel will provide creative solutions to real-world social-media-related issues and address emerging social media trends.

Don’t miss this opportunity to get up-to-date information on the fast-breaking developments in the critical area of social media so that you can most effectively meet the needs of your clients.

For more information or to register, please visit PLI’s website here. We hope to see you there!

CaptureThe latest issue of our Socially Aware newsletter is now available here.

In this edition, we provide five tips for reducing potential liability exposure in seeking to exploit user-generated content; we examine a Ninth Circuit decision highlighting the control that social media platform operators have over the content and data that users post to those platforms; we discuss five questions that companies should ask themselves to help prepare for a ransomware attack; we explore a controversial California court decision that narrows an important liability safe harbor for website operators; we review a federal court decision that illustrates the importance of securing clear and affirmative assent to electronic contracts; we take a look at some recent enforcement actions that indicate a shift toward requiring clearer and potentially more burdensome disclosures from companies engaged in interest-based advertising; and  we examine a recent Northern District of California decision holding that a mobile app developer was not be liable under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act for a text initiated by one of the app’s users.

All this—plus an infographic illustrating the impact of incorporating user-generated content in marketing campaigns.

Read our newsletter.

The Internet of Things is apparently to blame for the Web outage that paralyzed the online world earlier this month.

Justin Timberlake took down his “ballot selfie” from Instagram after Tennessee authorities made clear that it was illegal.

Presumably in order to help facilitate compliance with guidance from regulators in the United States, United Kingdom and elsewhere, YouTube is making available to video creators an easy-to-use “sponsored content” notification that they can opt to have appear during the first few seconds of their videos.

Will blockchain technology be the next big wave of disruption for the music industry?

With Tinder’s new feature, online daters can be sure their profiles feature the photos most likely to get right-swipes.

When the chief digital officer at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art lost his job, he turned to social media for advice.

The NFL’s new social media policy promises to impose hefty fines on member teams that post videos or animated GIFs of games, or use Facebook Live or Periscope to stream anything in the stadium.

When a Russian tech entrepreneur’s friend died, she used artificial intelligence and his old text messages to create a futuristic memorial.

Employed but curious about new job opportunities? Now you can change your LinkedIn profile to secretly signal to recruiters that you’re in the market for a new gig.

Guess what percentage of Americans one researcher predicts will own a virtual reality headset in 2016?

Could Google Flights be the ticket to finding the best possible fare to your 2016 winter holiday destination?

We’re delighted to publish our Social Media Safety Guide for Companies, which highlights key considerations to keep in mind in using social media to promote your company’s products and services and to engage with customers.

Social media has been referred to as the greatest development for marketers since the printing press, but the benefits of social media are not risk free; indeed, many companies have run into serious legal problems in their rush to take advantage of social media. Although not a substitute for advice from experienced legal counsel, our Guide is intended to highlight a number of emerging best practices for reducing U.S. legal risks in connection with corporate use of social media.

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